Disputes

Europe
Clyde & Co Criticized by the Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal After Fines for Money Laundering Breaches

By James Booth |

The full judgment in the case—which also saw three Clydes partners fined 10,000 pounds—raps Clydes for allowing its name to be “unintentionally lent to what appeared to have been a fraudulent financial scheme."

Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England.

Europe
Bank of England Chief Sees No Need for Tougher Fintech Regulation

By Stephanie Forshee |

Fintech could pose a threat to traditional banks in the United Kingdom, according to Bank of England Governor Mark Carney. But that doesn't mean he thinks they should be subject to tougher regulation.

U.S. Department of Justice.

DOJ's FCPA Pilot Program Wins Some White-Collar Praise, to a Point

By Sue Reisinger |

Weighing the risks of self-reporting a bribery violation, or hiding it, has always been a thorny issue for companies. That's the dilemma at the heart of the U.S. Justice Department's pilot program for violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Latin America
A Decade in Turmoil: Where Chiquita's GC Steered His Company Wrong

By Sue Reisinger |

In 2003 Chiquita Brands general counsel Robert Olson had to advise the company on whether to keep making "security payments" to known terrorists in Colombia. He told executives to keep paying.

Rudy Giuliani and Michael Mukasey

Emerging Markets
Giuliani, Mukasey Play Mysterious Roles in Case of Turkish Trader

By Andrew Denney |

A defense lawyer for Reza Zarrab, a Turkish gold trader charged with helping Iran avoid U.S. sanctions, confirmed the attorneys' involvement in response to a court order but said that details of the representation are confidential.

Michael Bennett

Europe
'A Mandate to Grow' - Linklaters Litigation Chief on the Firm's Plans to Boost its Disputes Credentials

By James Booth |

"Although the firm has been around for 180 years, we only elected our first litigation partner in 1971,” says Michael Bennett, the head of Linklaters’ dispute resolution division.

Asian Lawyer
Expert Analysis: Enforcing Foreign Arbitral Awards Against Foreign Corporations Registered to Do Business in New York

By Henry Weisburg, Christopher Ryan and Daniel Purisch |

Henry Weisburg, Christopher Ryan and Daniel Purisch of Shearman & Sterling discuss the Second Circuit's 2016 decision in Brown v. Lockheed Martin, which provides guidance as to how the principles established in the Daimler precedent should be applied to business registration statutes and illustrates why New York courts should not be able to exercise personal jurisdiction over an award debtor solely on the basis of business registration.

Europe
DOJ Indicts 4 in Yahoo Data Breach Linked to Russia

By Ross Todd |

An indictment unveiled in San Francisco Wednesday includes two Russian Federal Security Service officers.

Europe
The Irish Case That Could Upend US-EU Data Transfers (Again)

By Ben Hancock |

Depending on the court's ruling, the legal mechanism most companies rely on to transfer personal data outside the European Union could start to unravel.

Left to right: Daniel Pascucci and Joseph Dunn Mintz Levin

Asian Lawyer
When Hiding Assets Doesn’t Work: How Mintz Levin Recovered $20M for Cheated Client

By Jenna Greene |

Winning is great—but not if your client can’t collect. Faced with a defendant who tried just about every trick to hide assets, including a bankruptcy filing, off-shore fund maneuvering and dissolution of the business, a team from Mintz Levin Cohn Ferris Glovsky and Popeo wouldn’t take no for an answer.

Asian Lawyer
Canadian Companies Raise Cybersecurity Concerns Regarding New China Law

By Ed Silverstein |

A government spokesperson says Canadian businesses have expressed concerns over how they may be affected by China’s recent cybersecurity law.

U.S. Justice Department

Asian Lawyer
US Implicates In-House Lawyers at China's ZTE in Sanctions Case

By Sue Reisinger |

Inside the billion-dollar plea agreement between the U.S. government and the Chinese telecom giant ZTE Corp. sits a tale of lawyers gone bad. And at least one who didn't. U.S. authorities pointed fingers at in-house lawyers for their alleged roles in a scheme to violate trade sanctions.

Target Corp. is among the retailers that received letters from the New York attorney general's office requesting information on their on-call practices for employees.

Asian Lawyer
Target Corp. Puts FTC's 'Made in USA' Claims to Bed

By C. Ryan Barber |

Federal trade regulators have dropped their investigation into Target Corp. over pillows that were advertised as "Made in USA" but were, in fact, manufactured in China. Target pulled the mislabeled products from store shelves, corrected the country-of-origin information for its own-branded pillows and took steps to prevent further consumer deception.

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Europe
Second Circuit Weighs Limits on FCPA Reach

By Mark Hamblett |

A prosecutor and a defense lawyer gave a federal appeals court starkly different views on just how far the U.S. Congress intended the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act to reach in pursuing bribery abroad.

Melbourne, Australia

Asian Lawyer
Court Imposes Restrictions on Ex-Herbert Smith Freehills Partners Poached by White & Case in Australia

By Anna Zhang, Asian Lawyer, with Legal Week Staff |

Eight partners who quit Herbert Smith Freehills last year to launch White & Case’s new Australia practice will be unable to solicit clients or staff from their former firm until September, according to a decision handed down in the Australian courts earlier today.

Phil Ivey.

Europe
US Poker Star Takes $10M Cheating Lawsuit to UK Supreme Court

By Chris Johnson |

Phil Ivey has been granted permission by the U.K. Supreme Court to challenge a decision by the Court of Appeal. He is trying to recover 7.8 million pounds ($9.6 million) in winnings that have been withheld by a London casino after he was caught cheating.

Emerging Markets
Expert Analysis: Beneficial Ownership Registers: Transparency v. Privacy in the Cayman Islands

By Alex Brainis and Peter Colegate, Appleby |

The Cayman Islands' new centralized platform, only available to law enforcement, could be at odds with the current trend of greater control over personal data.

Jacob

Emerging Markets
After a Decade of Self-Exile in Africa, Former CEO to Serve Prison Term

By Mark Hamblett |

Ten years on the run in Namibia to avoid charges for his role in a stock options backdating scheme will cost Jacob "Kobi" Alexander 30 months in prison.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Europe
Supreme Court Limits Patent Liability for Component Makers in Global Supply Chain

By Scott Graham |

A unanimous court reversed the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, ruling that shipping a single component cannot trigger a provision of the Patent Act that applies extraterritorially.

Covecastles Resort

Latin America
Owners of Caribbean Resort Found Not Liable for Child's Assault

By Joel Stashenko |

The owners and operators of a luxury resort on the Caribbean island of Anguilla cannot be held liable for an attack on a guest family's 12-year-old child for which a gardener at the resort was arrested, a state judge has ruled.

Europe
Q&A: Slaughters’ Richard Swallow on Rolls-Royce, Wheeling Boardman Through an Airport and Advising Britney Spears

Richard Swallow, investigations co-head and City disputes partner at Slaughter and May, has spent the past year advising Rolls-Royce on the Serious Fraud Office’s probe into allegations of bribery and corruption at the company.

Europe
RatnerPrestia Settles Dispute Over Scuttled Germany Merger

By Scott Flaherty |

Less than a year after suing Germany’s Stolmár & Partner over a failed combination, Philadelphia area intellectual property boutique RatnerPrestia has settled breach of contract, fraud and other claims against the Munich-based patent firm.

Europe
Former KWM Staff Team Up for Legal Action over Handling of Redundancy Process

By Rose Walker |

About 200 former King & Wood Mallesons (KWM) European and Middle East (EUME) employees, including lawyers, have turn to employment law firm Herrington Carmichael to handle their claim that KWM failed to enter a formal consultation process of 45 days prior to making layoffs.

Melbourne, Australia

Asian Lawyer
Herbert Smith Freehills Sues Partners Poached by White & Case

By Anna Zhang |

Eight Australian partners at Herbert Smith Freehills have been named as defendants in a case over their en masse defection to the U.S. firm.

The Atlantis Paradise Island resort, located in the Bahamas.

Latin America
Three Firms Pump Fees From Bankrupt Bahamian Oil Shipper

By Brian Baxter |

Ultrapetrol Bahamas Ltd., a company that floats energy boats throughout South America, filed for bankruptcy in New York on Feb. 6. Zirinsky Law Partners, a firm formed last year by a former top bankruptcy partner at three Am Law 100 firms, is advising Ultrapetrol along with Hughes Hubbard & Reed and Seward & Kissel.

Asian Lawyer
Draft Executive Order Targeting Worker Visas Shakes Silicon Valley Tech Companies

By David Ruiz |

The torrent of drastic changes to U.S. immigration law—including a draft proposal of an executive order to restructure and possibly rescind entire worker visa programs—has sent Silicon Valley tech companies into a frenzy, seeking legal help for a multitude of questions.

Former Bio-Rad General Counsel, Sanford Wadler (left) leaves the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California

Asian Lawyer
Bio-Rad Trial Witnesses Claim Outburst, Obstruction by Ex-GC

By David Ruiz |

Bio-Rad Laboratories Inc. chief financial officer Christine Tsingos added a new claim to the company's case against fired general counsel Sanford Wadler in court Tuesday: Wadler allegedly once became openly hostile in a meeting, pounding his fists and yelling at the room.

Asian Lawyer
FCPA & Anti-Money Laundering: A Special Report

Half of the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network's 2016 enforcement actions were brought against companies in the gaming industry. And U.S. Department of Justice efforts in 2016 added greater specifics on the potential benefits of corporate self-disclosure. And want to know how broker-dealers can rely on investment advisers to verify the identity of shared customers? Read on.

Emerging Markets
Lawyers Respond to Trump's Immigration Order

More than 4,000 lawyers had signed up to volunteer legal services across the United States by Sunday in response to the Trump administration’s swift move to restrict immigration travel from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

Asian Lawyer
Sweatshops, Slavery and GCs

By Stephanie Forshee |

Two decades after retailers got blowback for their labor practices abroad, more top lawyers are stepping into business-focused roles and tackling sustainability and corporate social responsibility efforts.

A Ukrainian service person during Rapid Trident 2016 international team and staff drill in Yavoriv training range in the Lviv Region. Stringer/Sputnik via AP

Europe
Covington to Represent Ukrainian Oil Company in Case Against Russia

By Scott Flaherty |

Covington & Burling has secured a $6.31 million contract to represent Ukraine's state-run oil company Naftogaz in an arbitration dispute against the Russian government over its 2014 incursion into Crimea.

Europe
Trump and Transparency

By Michael D. Goldhaber, The Global Lawyer |

Anti-corruption efforts made strides during the Obama years. Will the momentum cease?

Europe
How VW's In-House Lawyers Screwed Up a Litigation Hold

By Sue Reisinger |

The obstruction of justice charge filed against Volkswagen AG pertains not only to lies by employees to federal regulators, but also to actions by VW's in-house legal team, according to statements attached to the plea agreement.

Asian Lawyer
The Patent Implications of Using AI in the Global Marketplace

By Jason Lohr, Hogan Lovells |

International usage can lead to problems through data collection, disclosure and more.

Europe
DLA Piper Profits As BHS Administration Fees Near £3 Million

By Chris Johnson |

DLA Piper continues to profit from its role advising the administrators on the collapse of British high street retailer BHS, with a leaked document revealing that professional advisors racked up another million pounds in fees in less than six weeks.

Europe
Uber, DLA Piper Dealt Another Blow in Workers' Rights Battle

By Chris Johnson |

In the latest development in Uber Technologies' long-running workers' rights battle in Europe, a Swiss insurance agency has ruled that its drivers are employees for whom the company must pay social security contributions.

Asian Lawyer
New Jersey Court Lacks Jurisdiction Over Indian Pharma Company Despite Its Local Subsidiary

By David Gialanella |

The Appellate Division found "insufficient evidence presented to pierce the corporate veil and impute Dishman USA's New Jersey contacts to" Dishman Pharmaceuticals, which is based in India.

Europe
No Time to Waste: U.S. Companies Will Face European, Homegrown Privacy and Security Challenges in 2017

By Donald G. Aplin, Bloomberg Law |

A look at the GDPR “tidal wave,” FTC authority clarification and more security and privacy challenges to watch for next year.

Europe
Are US Lawyers a Weak Link in the Fight Against Money Laundering?

By Susan Beck |

The United States trails other nations when it comes to attorneys' anti-money laundering requirements.

Europe
Teva Agrees to Pay $520M Over Bribes to Foreign Officials

By Charles Toutant |

Generic drugmaker Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. has agreed to pay more than $283 million to resolve criminal charges and fines over bribes to government officials in Russia, Ukraine and Mexico, in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Europe
Rules of the Road for Using Experts in International Arbitration

By Gilbert A. Samberg |

In international arbitration, relevant codified procedural rules are scarce. How, then, does one manage procedures concerning experts in international arbitrations? And what about all of the tactical decisions that would routinely follow from such rules?

A Braskem petrochemical plant in Brazil

Europe
Brazilian Company to Pay Record $2.6B Fine to Settle Foreign Bribery Case

By Mark Hamblett |

Brazilian construction conglomerate Odebrecht SA pleaded guilty to a single charge of conspiracy to violate provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act in a sweeping deal with U.S. prosecutors and authorities in Brazil and Switzerland.

Asian Lawyer
Will Trump Make America Corrupt Again?

By Michael D. Goldhaber, The Global Lawyer |

President-elect Donald Trump once called the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act a "horrible law." Will the U.S. continue to play the role of global corporate corruption cop?

Europe
Brexit Vote Lawyer “Confident” of Supreme Court Victory

By Chris Johnson |

The U.K. government has appealed a landmark High Court ruling that parliament must be allowed to vote on the triggering of Article 50, which starts a two-year deadline for a European Union member to complete its withdrawal from the political bloc.

Europe
Legal Tech Eyes Automation to Ease EU Data Compliance Challenges

By Ricci Dipshan |

Legal technology providers are leveraging automation to help global organizations bring their data storage and organization processes in line with Privacy Shield and GDPR regulations.

FILE - In this Aug. 21, 2015, file photo, former NBA star and current owner of the Charlotte Hornets, Michael Jordan, smiles at reporters in Chicago. President Barack Obama is honoring Jordan, Cicely Tyson, Tom Hanks, and others with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor.  (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

Asian Lawyer
Michael Jordan Wins Trademark Case in China's Top Court

By Anna Zhang |

China's top court has ruled that former NBA star Michael Jordan owns the trademark rights to his name in Chinese characters.

Latin America
Human Rights Claims Against Chiquita for Funding Colombian Paramilitaries Will Proceed in U.S. Court

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

A decade-old case alleging that Chiquita Brand International financed Colombian death squads will move forward in U.S. courts after a federal judge on Tuesday rejected the company's argument that lawsuits filed against it by thousands of victims of Colombia's violent paramilitary groups should be heard in Colombia.

Europe
Leaked Emails Show Russian Lawyers Manipulated Yukos Court Rulings

By Chris Johnson |

Lawyers for Russia’s state-controlled oil giant Rosneft manipulated court rulings in order to help it seize hundreds of millions of dollars in assets belonging to the now-defunct private oil major Yukos, the Financial Times reports.

Europe
Uber Taps Cuatrecasas for Landmark EU Regulatory Case

By Rebekah Mintzer |

Uber Technologies Inc. has chosen Cani Fernández, an attorney with experience in antitrust, mergers and acquisitions and European Union affairs at Cuatrecasas, Goncalves Pereira, to argue on its behalf in a European Court of Justice hearing that could determine how Uber should be regulated within the European Union.

Cuban spy Juan Pablo Roque at his home in Cuba in 2012

Latin America
Judge Won't Order NYS to Release Cuban Funds to Woman Duped by Spying Spouse

By Joel Stashenko |

A federal judge in Albany ruled Nov. 21 that a woman who unknowingly married a Cuban spy cannot collect a Florida default judgment of $7.17 million against the Cuban government and the former spouse from accounts held as abandoned property by New York state using the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act.

Europe
US Court Upholds $505,000 Dutch Judgment Against Greenhouse

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A Pennsylvania federal judge declined to uproot a judgment against an in-state greenhouse stemming from a Dutch bulb grower's lawsuit filed in the Netherlands.

Pictet headquarters in Geneva

Europe
NY Has Jurisdiction Over Saudi Businessman's Suit Against Swiss Bank, Court Says

By Joel Stashenko |

New York's highest court ruled Nov. 22 that the state's long-arm statute gives its courts jurisdiction to hear a Saudi businessman's claim that a Swiss bank with accounts in the state should be held liable for a bribery, kickback and money laundering scheme involving some of his former employees.

Viktor Bout in 2010

Europe
Appeals Court Rejects Russian Arms Trafficker's Bid for New Trial

By Mark Hamblett |

A federal appeals court swiftly rejected a bid for a new trial by convicted Russian arms trafficker Viktor Bout.

Sturgis Sobin, Derek Ludwin and James O'Connell, partners at Covington & Burling

Asian Lawyer
Litigators of the Week: A Win for Free Trade and Chinese Steel

By Ben Hancock |

When the U.S. International Trade Commission waded into a legal issue it hadn’t touched in almost 40 years--how to handle allegations of price-fixing--a Covington & Burling team rose to the challenge

Europe
UK Court Ruling Increases Liability Exposure of Litigation Funders

By Susan Beck |

On Friday the English Court of Appeal issued a landmark ruling affecting litigation funders who financed an unsuccessful $1.6 billion case against two U.S. oil companies. The court ruled that the funders, under the U.K.’s “loser pays” rule, could be forced to pay more than $24.7 million in legal costs for defendants in the case.

British Virgin Islands.

Europe
Destination Arbitration? British Virgin Islands Opens New Arbitration Center

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

A new arbitration center in the British Virgin Islands has formally opened for business. And some high-profile figures in the arbitration world are getting behind the effort.

Asian Lawyer
JPMorgan Chase Settles Foreign Bribery Claims for $264M

A subsidiary of JPMorgan Chase & Co. ran a nepotism program on a grand scale in China, Justice Department officials said Thursday, as the bank agreed to pay $264.4 million to settle allegations it hired the sons and daughters of government officials to bribe its way to investment deals.

Tetra Pak

Asian Lawyer
China Fines Tetra Pak Record $97 Million for Antitrust Violations

By Anna Zhang |

State Administration for Industry and Commerce headed down its largest antitrust fine to the Swedish packaging giant, ending a nearly four-year-long probe.

anekoho/Shutterstock.com

Asian Lawyer
Singapore Offers Clues on the Future of Courtroom Technology

By Ricci Dipshan |

A look at how the integrated courtroom and related technologies have evolved in the city-nation.

Asian Lawyer
China Passes Controversial Internet Security Law

By Anna Zhang |

China passed a controversial internet security law on Monday despite strong opposition from foreign companies.

Europe
Another Ex-Partner Sued As Firms Get More Aggressive With Leavers

By Chris Johnson |

Addleshaw Goddard has brought arbitration proceedings against its former head of real estate Mark Haywood.

Europe
Facebook Tells U.K. Insurer Not to Read Users' Post Data to Set Prices

By Thomas Phillips |

Facebook denied insurance company Admiral’s plan to scan potential customers’ posts on the social network to gather information used in setting their individual prices.

Asian Lawyer
The Global Lawyer: Asia Lets Loose the Hounds of Third-Party Funding

Hong Kong’s law reform commission called for legalizing arbitration finance on Oct. 12. If the past is any guide, Singapore’s law ministry, which reviewed guidelines for third-party funding this summer, will swiftly make a matching move.

Europe
UK's Uber Drivers Get Workers' Rights in Landmark Employment Tribunal

By Chris Johnson |

U.K. drivers for mobile cab-hailing app company Uber have won the right to be classed as workers rather than self-employed after succeeding in a landmark legal challenge.

Raymond McCord, right, faces the media outside the High Court in Belfast, Northern Ireland, following a judge's dismissal of the U.K.'s first legal challenges to its split from Europe known as Brexit.

Europe
Brexit Legal Challenge Fails as UK Court Declares Lawsuit 'Not Viable'

By Chris Johnson |

A historic legal challenge designed to block Britain’s exit from the European Union has failed after a U.K. court rejected it as “not viable.”

U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Europe
Rights of Nonparty, Nonwitnesses Factored in Law Firm's Disqualification

By Mark Hamblett |

The Second Circuit said that Baker & Hostetler partner John Moscow's nine-month representation in 2008 of investment advisory firm Hermitage, a putative victim of a $230 million fraud on the Russian Treasury, disqualified the firm from defending the Prevezon real estate companies, accused of laundering the fraud's proceeds, on a civil forfeiture action.

Europe
Dentons Sued over Advice on Gold Trading Scheme

By Rose Walker |

Dentons Europe LLP is the target of a negligence suit filed by more than 200 plaintiffs seeking to recoup investments they made in a gold-trading scheme whose owners were advised by legacy Salans.

Europe
London Calling: FRONTEO's European Expansion, With Eye on Regulated EU Market

By Ricci Dipshan |

The e-discovery managed services firm noted that it will take a "wait-and-see" attitude to opening an additional center outside of the U.K., given the country's impending Brexit.

Latin America
Court Orders $21M to Venezuelan Hospital Over Deception

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

The Eleventh Circuit awards a Venezuelan hospital a $21 million judgment against a group that the court found conspired to deceive it.

Asian Lawyer
When Bad Things Happen to Bad Companies

By Michael D. Goldhaber / The Global Lawyer |

In case after case, the bogeymen of arbitration are going up in smoke, The Global Lawyer writes. But do critics rejoice when bad things happen to bad companies? No. Rather than celebrate good arbitral judgment, they insist the system remains broken.

Embraer facility at Fort Lauderdale International Airport.

Latin America
Brazil's Embraer Agrees to $205M Penalty for Foreign Bribery Scheme

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

Brazilian aircraft manufacturer Embraer S.A. has agreed to pay more than $205 million under an agreement with U.S. regulators over allegations it bribed officials in the Dominican Republic, Saudi Arabia and Mozambique to win government contracts.

Europe
Hogan Lovells and Mishcon Take Lead Roles as KWM Sues Goodwin and Former Corporate Cohead Lever

By Rose Walker |

King & Wood Mallesons is suing former co-head of corporate Richard Lever and his new firm Goodwin Procter, following a series of partner moves to the US firm.

Bombay High Court

Asian Lawyer
Firm Takes Legal Action Against Ex Partner Accused of Participating in 'Diabolical’ Plot

By Frances Ivens, Legal Week |

Indian firm Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas (CAM) has taken legal action against its former Chennai office head over allegations relating to confidentiality and noncompete clauses.

Europe
Expert Analysis: Will the DOJ Find Deutsche Bank 'Too Big to Jail'?

By John F. Wood |

Recent media reports regarding a potential multibillion-dollar settlement between the U.S. Department of Justice and Deutsche Bank have breathed new life into the debate regarding whether major financial institutions can be 'too big to jail.'

Europe
Book Review: Biography at Nuremberg

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

In "East West Street," Philippe Sands weaves the stories of three lawyers who passed through Lviv into a grand history of international criminal law culminating at Nuremberg, then folds it into a family mystery-cum-memoir of the Holocaust.

Europe
Brexit Lawyer Dismisses Government Vote Promise as 'Sop to Judges'

By Chris Johnson |

In a lawsuit challenging the U.K. prime minister's right to initiate the country's withdrawal from the European Union, a goverment lawyer said Tuesday it was “very likely” that Parliament would be able to vote on the Brexit process. But a lawyer representing the plaintiffs says that's not enough.

Europe
Litigation Funders Planning a New Role: Law Firm Ownership

By Roy Strom |

Finance has a long history of creative expansion. Financing lawsuits is proving to be no exception.

Reza Zarrab

Emerging Markets
Judge Refuses to Dismiss Indictment Over Illegal Iran Trades

By Mark Hamblett |

Criminal penalties for violating trade sanctions against the Iranian regime apply to the actions of a foreign national outside of the United States, a federal judge ruled Monday.

Asian Lawyer
Class Action Filed Against World’s First Publicly Listed Law Firm Over Share Price Crash

By Chris Johnson |

A group of Slater and Gordon shareholders have launched a class action against the Australian personal injury law firm following a catastrophic U.K. acquisition that led to its share price crashing 95 percent in less than a year.

Asian Lawyer
Where Are the Women and Minorities in Global Dispute Resolution?

By Christine Simmons |

Serving on international ADR panels is nice work if you can get it. But those selected as arbitrators are almost always men, predominantly white and disproportionately from wealthy nations.

Europe
'Yukos v. Russia' Update: U.S. Court Stays $50 Billion Enforcement

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

On Sept. 30, a Washington, D.C., federal court stayed U.S. confirmation proceedings pending the claimants’ appeals in the Dutch courts, which in the first instance vacated the $50 billion awards rendered by international arbitrators against Russia for seizing OAO Yukos Oil Co. from its controlling shareholders.

Lawrence W. Newman and David Zaslowsky

Emerging Markets
Expert Analysis: Personal Jurisdiction Under Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act

By Lawrence W. Newman and David Zaslowsky |

When foreign states engage in commercial transactions in the United States, they are subject to the limitations on their sovereign immunity set out in the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act. How have courts dealt with the most frequently invoked commercial activity exceptions?

Box of Hebei Welcome Pharmaceutical's Vitamin C

Asian Lawyer
For Chinese Companies, the My-Government-Made-Me-Do-It Antitrust Defense May Not Work Next Time

By Anna Zhang |

When a Chinese company escaped a U.S. price-fixing judgment on the grounds of international comity, some were outraged. But changes in China's antitrust laws mean that such a victory is unlikely to be repeated.

U.S. District Judge James Donato, Northern District of California

Asian Lawyer
In Price-Fixing Cases, Two Judges Rule on Reach of US Antitrust Law

By Ben Hancock |

A pair of district court rulings reinforce plaintiffs lawyers' ability to sue foreign companies over claims that they fixed prices, even when the transactions at issue took place overseas.

Asian Lawyer
GlaxoSmithKline to Pay $20M SEC Fine for Bribes in China

By Anna Zhang |

British pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline will pay $20 million to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to settle charges of bribing Chinese doctors and officials in order to boost sales.

Europe
What's New in Yukos v. Russia? The Truth

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Sometimes litigation slips into self-parody. We may have just reached that point in the Yukos case, with Russia’s “reply to opposition to motion re motion for leave to file a sur-reply in opposition to petitioners’ motion to stay.”

Asian Lawyer
Volkswagen’s Legal Troubles Extend to Australia

By Anna Zhang |

Volkswagen’s legal troubles have extended to Australia, where the country’s competition regulator has filed a lawsuit against the German automaker over the company’s emissions scandal.

Asian Lawyer
AB InBev Pays $6M to Settle Foreign Bribery Claims

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

International brewing giant Anheuser-Busch InBev has agreed to pay $6 million to settle claims that its joint venture in India used third-party promoters to bribe government officials, the Securities and Exchange Commission announced.

Justice William Blair, judge in charge of the Commercial Court, discusses the introduction of the new Financial List in the High Court of England and Wales at the offices of Brown Rudnick on Sept. 22.

Europe
British Judge Discusses New London Business Court During NY Visit

By Phil Albinus |

As business disputes grow in size and complexity, would a specialized court with judges who are experts in the matters, and who could speed up rulings and appeals, be a good idea in the United States? That was among the topics at a discussion given last week by The Hon. Mr. Justice Blair at the Times Square offices of Brown Rudnick.

Europe
VW to Foreign Plaintiffs: Quit Fishing and Do Your Own Discovery

By Jenna Greene |

When foreign plaintiffs requested copies of all the documents—20 million pages—that Volkswagen has produced as part of multi-district litigation in San Francisco federal court, my initial reaction was 'Sure, hand ‘em over.' Except it's not that simple.

Emerging Markets
Obama Vetoes ‘Sponsors of Terrorism’ Bill That Grew Out of 9/11, but Congress Likely to Override; After 15 Years, Case Against Saudi Arabia May Finally Be Heard

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act, or JASTA, passed both houses of Congress unanimously. Some version of it is highly likely to become law this year. What will then unfold in the courts?

Asian Lawyer
Nu Skin Violates FCPA With China Charitable Donation

By Anna Zhang |

Provo, Utah-based cosmetic maker Nu Skin Enterprises Inc. has agreed to pay $765,688 to settle a U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission investigation into a questionable charity donation the company made in China in violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Yellow pills forming shape to C alphabet on wood background

Asian Lawyer
Letting Chinese Companies Play by Their Own Rules in U.S. Courts

By Jenna Greene |

In an unsatisfying decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on Tuesday let a Chinese vitamin C maker off the hook for price fixing.

Box of Hebei Welcome Pharmaceutical's Vitamin C

Asian Lawyer
Appeals Court Vacates $147M Judgment Over Chinese Vitamin C

By Mark Hamblett |

Chinese vitamin C sellers are off the hook for violating U.S. antitrust law because they were compelled by the Chinese government to set prices and reduce quantities for the vitamin.

Deutsche Bank Headquarters in Germany

Europe
Deutsche Bank Taps Two Big Firms to Resolve $14B DOJ Claim

By Julie Triedman |

Simpson Thacher & Bartlett and Latham & Watkins are said to be advising the German financial services giant as it copes with a reported $14 billion demand by U.S. regulators to pay for its role in the 2008 financial crisis.

Latin America
After 19 Years, Chile Wins Arbitration Over Newspaper Seized by Pinochet

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

An arbitration stemming from Chile's 1973 expropriation of a newspaper during the coup d'etat that toppled then-Chilean President Salvador Allende has concluded with an arbitral tribunal siding with the current Chilean government.

Opus 2 International’s hearing room built for electronic paperless trials.

First US Integrated Electronic Courtrooms Launched in Miami, New York

By Ricci Dipshan |

In Miami, the integrated courtroom was used for international litigation, with witnesses in different time zones and language barriers.

John C. Coffee Jr.

Europe
Securities Litigation Goes Global

By John C. Coffee Jr. |

In his Corporate Securities column, John C. Coffee Jr. of Columbia Law School discusses the spread of "entrepreneurial litigation" to Europe, where major securities class actions have recently settled, and he writes that the most striking fact about those actions is the key organizational role in structuring them played by traditional American plaintiff law firms.

Europe
DOJ Gets First Guilty Plea in VW Emissions Probe

By Stephanie Forshee |

The U.S. Department of Justice has announced its first guilty plea in its probe of Volkswagen's scheme to cheat U.S. emissions tests.

Cisco Systems

Europe
Cisco Cleared on FCPA Claims, but Tax Probe Looms

By Sue Reisinger |

There was good and not so good legal news this week for Cisco Systems Inc.

Europe
Biggest Ever U.K. Damages Claim Filed In Landmark Class Action

By Chris Johnson |

Continental Breakfast: Your Daily Update on What's Happening in Europe.

International law systems, justice, human rights and global business education concept with world map on a school globe and a gavel on a desk on blue background.

Asian Lawyer
Law Profs Attack TPP’s ‘Rigged Pseudo Court’--and They Have a Point

By Jenna Greene |

A sham. A disaster. A disgrace. That’s how opponents describe the legal process for resolving disputes under the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Bruce Sewell, Senior Vice President and General Counsel of Apple, Inc., testifies before the House Judiciary Committee during a hearing titled

Europe
Apple's GC Calls EU Tax Position 'Legal Mumbo Jumbo'

By Sue Reisinger |

Apple Inc. general counsel Bruce Sewell has joined the company's chief executive in speaking out against the European Commission's demand that Apple pay a staggering bill for back taxes of $14.5 billion.

Europe
Apple Hires Top U.K. Law Firm To Deal With 'Political Crap'

By Chris Johnson |

When you're the head of a company with a market cap that's bigger than the GDP of Sweden, perhaps you don't need to worry about being diplomatic.

Emerging Markets
How the Second Circuit Blew Up the $655M PLO Verdict

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The Daimler ruling was a car bomb waiting to detonate.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission building in Washington, D.C.

Asian Lawyer
AstraZeneca to Pay $5.5M to Settle FCPA Claims

By Sue Reisinger |

AstraZeneca agreed Tuesday to pay $5.5 million in penalties and interest to settle claims that it violated the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act through improper payments to health care providers in China and Russia.

Workers clean inside a cafeteria at Hebrew University in Jerusalem in 2002, hours after a bomb exploded, killing nine, including four Americans.

Emerging Markets
Circuit Rejects $655M Award Against PLO for Terror Attacks

By Mark Hamblett |

A $655 million award against the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Palestinian Authority for attacks that killed or wounded members of 11 American families in Israel has been thrown out by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit.

Asian Lawyer
In Praise of Cyber Lawfare

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Everyone thought that the U.S. indicted Chinese hackers merely for show. Everyone was wrong, writes The Global Lawyer.

Europe
Google Faces New Challenge In Europe As EU Plans Levy On Search Engines

By Chris Johnson |

New rules would force online services such as Google News and Yahoo News to negotiate deals with news organizations for showing their articles.

Emerging Markets
Trader Joe’s Wins Lanham Act Appeal Against Canadian Copycat

By Scott Graham |

The Lanham Act can stretch across the U.S. border to reach a Canadian man selling Trader Joe's merchandise at a store he calls Pirate Joe's in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Lebanese Canadian Bank headquarters in Beirut

Emerging Markets
Hezbollah Victims Lose Appeal in Terror Funding Case Against Lebanese Bank

By Mark Hamblett |

Victims of Hezbollah rocket attacks in Israel in 2006 cannot sue a Lebanese bank in U.S. courts simply because the bank allegedly used a New York account to transfer several million dollars, the Second Circuit ruled Wednesday.

Michael Jablonski.

Emerging Markets
The Future of Global Law: A Q&A on Cybersecurity with Michael Jablonski

By Gabrielle Orum Hernández |

As countries vie for control over information infrastructure and data stream regulation, Jablonski says we may see an increase in international arbitration.

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission building in Washington, D.C.

Emerging Markets
Litigation Funder's Suit Calls SEC Process Unconstitutional

By Charles Toutant |

RD Legal Capital, facing a fraud investigation, is challenging administrative enforcement proceedings by Securities and Exchange Commission against unregulated parties.

Latin America
Chevron in Ecuador: Is the End in Sight?

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Now that the Second Circuit has fully embraced Chevron Corp.’s view—that the $9.5 billion Ecuadorean judgment against it was rotten with fraud—is there any chance that either side will give up their case? Don't hold your breath.

Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at Youngstown State University in Youngstown, Ohio August 15, 2016.

Asian Lawyer
Would the International Emergency Economic Powers Act Help Trump?

By Thomas McCarthy and Hal Shapiro |

OPINION: The candidate could potentially use the act to advance his national security plan.

Shepard Goldfein and James A. Keyte

Asian Lawyer
Chinese Antitrust Enforcement and the U.S.: an Uncertain Path

By Shepard Goldfein and James Keyte |

In their Antitrust Trade and Practice column, Shepard Goldfein and James Keyte write: As China's political and economic impact continues to grow around the world, U.S. regulators have been forced to grapple with how to protect U.S. interests in a system sprung from a very different government ideology. This clash has played out in the antitrust context in the drafting, implementation and subsequent reaction to China's Anti-Monopoly Law.

Latin America
How Key Energy Got the SEC to Go Easy

By Sue Reisinger |

When the Securities and Exchange Commission approached Key Energy Services Inc. about bribery allegations in Mexico, the company went into high gear. It launched a major internal investigation and reformed its compliance efforts, including shaking up its legal department.

An miner shouts slogans during a protest on the outskirts of El Alto, Bolivia, where protestors have placed stones on the highway to block traffic, Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2012. Hundreds of independent miners have placed large stones on three principal highways blocking traffic that leads into Bolivia's capital city. Independent and state miners have been staging rival protests for months for control of the Colquiri tin mine, which is 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of La Paz. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

Latin America
Glencore Begins Arbitration Against Bolivia Over Mine Nationalization

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

The global mining and commodities producer has begun arbitration proceedings against Bolivia for its nationalization of properties since 2007.

Europe
Partners Raise Concerns Over Potential U.K. Fines for Tax Avoidance Advice

By James Booth |

Under a proposal from HM Revenue & Customs, advisers whose tax avoidance schemes are defeated in court may have to pay fines of up to 100 percent of the tax avoided.

Emirates NBD in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Emerging Markets
A Master at Work: Dissecting the Closing Argument in Latham’s Huge Win for Middle Eastern Bank

By Jenna Greene |

For Latham & Watkins, defending a Middle Eastern bank accused of stealing trade secrets from a plucky American entrepreneur could have been a tough sell to a federal jury in Orange County, California. How did firm lawyers come out on top?

Twitter headquarters

Emerging Markets
Twitter Fends Off Suit Over ISIS Attack

By Ben Hancock |

A federal judge Wednesday dismissed a suit against Twitter Inc. that seeks to hold the social media platform liable for a 2015 terrorist attack in Jordan that left two Americans dead and was linked to the Islamic State.

Latin America
The Second Circuit Makes Chevron v. Donziger Simple

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

On Monday the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit laid it out with admirable clarity. Steven Donziger lied and cheated his way to a multibillion-dollar Ecuadorean judgment against Chevron.

Venezuelan Currency

Latin America
Venezuela Central Bank Drops Appeal in Case Against Financial Website

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

Venezuela's central bank has withdrawn its appeal of a lawsuit it filed against an online publication that publishes the Venezuelan black market exchange rate.

Europe
UK Probes Airbus Bribe Allegations

By Sue Reisinger |

The United Kingdom's Serious Fraud Office announced Monday that it has opened a criminal investigation into possible fraud, bribery and corruption in the company's civil aviation business, which is based in France.

Thurgood Marshall U.S. Courthouse.

Latin America
Second Circuit Rules for Chevron in $9B Environmental Case

By Mark Hamblett |

The appeals court on Monday affirmed the trial judge’s finding that a 10-figure judgment against Chevron was tainted by fraud and judicial corruption in Ecuador.

Latin America
Second Circuit Rules for Chevron in $9B Environmental Case

By Mark Hamblett |

The appeals court on Monday affirmed the trial judge's finding that a 10-figure judgment against Chevron was tainted by fraud and judicial corruption in Ecuador.

Beijing Intellectual Property Court

Asian Lawyer
IP Litigation in China: Foreign Companies Still Face Challenges

By Anna Zhang |

Recent studies have shown some promising win rates for international companies' China patent litigation. But problems remain.

Latin America
Pemex Loses U.S. Appeal of $406M Arbitration Award

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

The Second Circuit has upheld a $406 million arbitration award that had been set aside by a Mexican court.

Emerging Markets
Why Do the Panama Papers Name So Few American Clients?

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

U.S. citizens get relatively few mentions in the Panama Papers. The explanation might be aggressive American tax enforcement—or inadequate U.S. measures to counter money laundering.

LGT bank headquarters near Vaduz Castle, the palace and official residence of the Prince of Liechtenstein.

Europe
Court: IRS Can't Enforce Summons in Global Scandal

By Mark Hamblett |

Ruling in a wide-ranging investigation into a 2008 global tax scandal involving a financial institution owned by the royal family of Liechtenstein, the Second Circuit said Steven Greenfield's Fifth Amendment right against self incrimination would be violated by enforcement of an IRS summons.

Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin smokes a cigarette, as he leaves the scene of a suicide bomb attack against an Israeli bus near the Jewish settlement of Kfar Darom in the Gaza Strip, April 9, 1995. Suicide bombers launched two attacks in the Gaza Strip, killing seven Israelis and wounding 45 others. Islamic militants claimed responsibility.

Emerging Markets
D..C. Circuit Rejects Terror Victims Claims to Foreign Internet Domains

By Zoe Tillman |

Treating the domains for Iran, Syria and North Korea—.ir, .sy and .kp, respectively—like government property could trigger a response that would destabilize the internet, Judge Karen LeCraft Henderson wrote.

Europe
VW Aims to Throw Out Suit by U.S. Investors

The auto maker argues that the case does not belong in an American court.

Darryl Lewis, American contractor suing officials of the Democratic Republic of Congo

Emerging Markets
American Tortured in DRC Sues Congolese Officials

By Suzanne Monyak |

Darryl Lewis was working as a security advisor for Congolese opposition leader Moise Katumbi when he was arrested and then tortured by a DRC intelligence agency that accused him of attempting to overthrow the Congolese government, his suit claims.

Europe
Five Ways Brexit May Impact Your Intellectual Property Rights

By James M. McCarthy, Eric R. Moran and Colin Wright, McDonnell Boehnen Hulbert & Berghoff |

Rights holders should still consider the possible impacts that the U.K.'s departure will have on their patents, trademarks, designs and copyrights.

Asian Lawyer
China Legalizes Ride-sharing Services

By Anna Zhang |

The Chinese government said it will legalize online car-hailing applications such as Uber and its domestic rival Didi Chuxing.

Nicholas M. De Feis and Philip C. Patterson

Emerging Markets
Expert Analysis: Does the New FCPA Leniency Program Threaten Due Process?

By Nicholas M. De Feis and Philip C. Patterson |

A new pilot program that offers leniency to corporations that self-report Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations requires certain conduct by corporations to prove their commitment to cooperation with the government. But the cooperation contemplated by the program moves corporations closer to, and perhaps over, the line at which they become state actors.

Europe
Forget VW. The Monster Truck Case Is Worth $180 Billion

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

A 3 billion euro fine against Europe's truck cartel doubles the old record. But civil damages are what really terrify the truck industry.

Marmal Military Base in Afghanistan.

Asian Lawyer
Defense Contractor Wants Afghan Law Applied to Suit in LA--Except for the Flogging Part

By Jenna Greene |

At first glance, the complaint looks like your average drunk driving negligence suit. Except defense contracting giant AECOM argues Afghan law should apply.

Christopher Bogart.

Europe
Burford Capital Again Announces Big Litigation Earnings

By Julie Triedman |

Four months after reporting record annual earnings, U.K.-based litigation funder Burford Capital LLC once again announced that it has topped last year's first-half earnings and new investments by wide margins in early 2016. Simpson Thacher is one firm benefiting from Burford's largesse.

Asian Lawyer
Lessons from U.S. v. 'Wolf of Wall Street'

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The U.S. Kleptocracy Initiative says "f--- you" to kleptocrats. What about their lawyers?

LAN passenger jet airplane at the airport of El Calafate in Patagonia.

Latin America
LAN Airlines Pays $22M to End FCPA Probe

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

The agreement resolves parallel SEC and DOJ investigations into a $1.15 million payment that the agencies said went to bribe union leaders in Argentina.

Europe
Expert Analysis: Intellectual Property Rights in the U.K. After Brexit

By Lawrence E. Ashery |

Brexit's effects will vary. Expect delays for the Unitary Patent and the Unified Patent Court. Other IP protection mechanisms may be less affected.

Latin America
Walmart Defeats Shareholder Suit Over Mexico Bribery Scandal

By Zoe Tillman |

The Eighth Circuit on Friday sided with the mega-retailer and shut the door on a shareholder class action.

Matt Stolper, director of the Persepolis Fortification Archive at the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute, holds a large Persepolis Fortification tablet with cuneiform text on Oct. 16, 2008. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit ruled on July 19 that victims of a 1997 terrorist bombing in Israel can’t claim the tablets and other artifacts to satisfy a multimillion-dollar judgment against Iran.

Emerging Markets
Seventh Circuit Denies Terror Victims' Claim to Persian Artifacts

By Zoe Tillman |

At issue in the case are 30,000 clay tablets from the ancient city of Persepolis. The three-judge panel's decision conflicts with one from the Ninth Circuit in another case earlier this year, setting the stage for possible review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

A shopkeeper displays two packs of cigarettes with newly-released warning labels against smoking in Montevideo, Uruguay. (AP Photo/Marcelo Hernandez)

Latin America
Plain Packaging and Stricter Tobacco Labeling Expected to Spread in Latin America

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

Latin American countries may be more emboldened to enact bolder anti-tobacco legislation after Uruguay succesfully defends itself against tobacco company investment lawsuit.

Europe
VW Buyers in Europe Enlist US Firms to Clear Hurdles to Recovery

By Amanda Bronstad |

Lawyers hoping to sue Volkswagen in Europe face a host of challenges.

Europe
First Brexit Lawsuit, Potentially More, on Today's Continental Breakfast

By Chris Johnson |

The first of several potential Brexit-related disputes enters court today. The claim, brought on behalf of London-based hairdresser Deir Dos Santos, seeks a judicial review of how Article 50—the procedure by which a member state leaves the EU—can be triggered.

Asian Lawyer
Expert Analysis: Stanford FCPA Database Upstages Big Law Efforts

By Ryan McConnell and Stephanie Bustamante |

A new database from Stanford Law School offers unique insight on Foreign Corrupt Practices Act settlements.

US Navy Battle Ship at San Diego Bay.

Europe
U.S. Navy Faces $596M Infringement Suit Over Virtual Reality Software

By Zoe Tillman |

German computer software company Bitmanagement Software is suing for the U.S. government for $596 million, accusing the U.S. Navy of installing hundreds of thousands of unlicensed copies of Bitmanagement's virtual reality software.

Europe
District Court Greenlights Suit Against German Manufacturer

By Tom McParland |

A Delaware federal judge has allowed a contractual suit against a German airplane-parts manufacturer to proceed, finding the court maintained personal jurisdiction over the company under Delaware's long-arm statute.

Asian Lawyer
Litigator of the Week: Paul Reichler of Foley Hoag

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Paul Reichler has been dubbed Mr. World Court for his dominance at the seat of public international law. But in the past week Mr. World Court became Mr. Arbitration. It was a great week for public health and maritime borders. And a terrible week for international bullies.

Europe
Microsoft Prevails on Appeal in Dodging Warrant for Foreign Emails

By Mark Hamblett |

Microsoft and other U.S.-based internet service providers won a major victory when the Second Circuit found that the company is not required to comply with a U.S. warrant for customer emails stored on a server in Ireland.

Europe
European Digital Rights Advocates Warn about Trade Agreements

By Ed Silverstein |

The European Union is not doing enough to safeguard personal data and privacy rights in trade agreements, a new study warns.

Emerging Markets
Lawsuit Assails Alleged Facebook Role in Hamas Terror

By Ross Todd |

Families of five victims killed in attacks in Israel have filed a $1 billion lawsuit against Facebook in the Southern District, claiming the social network allows Hamas to recruit and radicalize potential terrorists and raise funds despite widespread criticism.

Former Rabobank traders Anthony Allen, left, and Anthony Conti in 2015

Europe
Defense Asks for New Trial, Judge in Libor Case

By Mark Hamblett |

Tainted testimony compelled in London tarnished the trial of the first two people convicted in the United States of manipulating a benchmark interest rate, lawyers for the defendants told a federal appeals court.

Marie Colvin, veteran correspondent for London's The Sunday Times

Emerging Markets
Shearman & Sterling's Family Ties Behind Syrian Government Suit

By Roy Strom |

For the lawyers who filed suit Saturday seeking to hold Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's government responsible for the death of veteran war correspondent Marie Colvin, the work was intensely personal.

Europe
Privacy Shield Approved by EU Member States, Set to Land This Week

By Ricci Dipshan |

The agreement's approval comes after final negotiations concluded on the eve of the Brexit vote.

Latin America
The Global Lawyer: Will DOJ Indict Panama Papers' Lead Partner?

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Vulture fund Elliott Associates is testing the viability of Panama Papers prosecution.

Kate Vernon, left, and Boris Bronfentrinker, right.

Europe
Quinn Emanuel, Litigation Funder Team Up for Landmark $25B MasterCard Fight

By Julie Triedman |

The case, which promises to be the largest yet under the U.K.'s retooled competition law, marks the largest non-U.S. investment by Chicago-based litigation funder Gerchen Keller Capital LLC.

Europe
IRS Investigating Facebook Over Ireland Asset Transfer

By Ross Todd |

The U.S. Department of Justice is asking for a court order forcing Facebook Inc. to provide information to the IRS related to its transfer of many of its global assets to its Irish holding company.

Emerging Markets
U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit Emerging as "Non-Rocket Docket" to the World

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

When will the Second Circuit rule in Chevron v. Donziger? The appeals court is taking its time with some big, divisive cases.

A Havana Club rum truck drives through the main highway in Varadero, Cuba.  It supplies the resort in the area.  Havana Club was established in 1878 and was nationalized by the Cuban government after the Cuban Revolution in 1959.

Latin America
Demon Rum and the Havana Club Trademark Saga

By Lisa Shuchman |

The U.S.-Cuba rapprochement adds a wrinkle to the Havana Club trademark saga.

Europe
Facebook Wins Appeals Court Legal Victory in Europe Over Privacy Concerns

By Ed Silverstein |

The court ruled the Belgian Privacy Commission cannot stop Facebook from tracking non-Facebook users that visit its pages.

Europe
Expert Analysis: 'RJR Nabisco' and the Future of Extraterritoriality

By Timothy G. Nelson, Lea Haber Kuck and Ashley Fernandez |

The Supreme Court's ruling further limits the ability to seek redress for wrongs occurring abroad.

Illustration by Anthony Freda

Europe
Europe Says No to Treaty Arbitration

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

While industry slept, the European Union blew up its investor-state arbitration system. Will a new court replace it?

Europe
Europeans Debate How to Handle Intra-EU Investor Disputes

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The EU insists that member states must discard the nearly 200 investment treaties between EU nations. But what comes next?

Latin America
Expert Analysis: What the Panama Papers Should Teach Companies about Money Laundering

By Jon Barooshian |

The release of the Panama Papers shines a light on dirty money overseas.

Emerging Markets
Turkish Human Rights Suit Against Muslim Cleric Tossed

By P.J. D’Annunzio |

A federal judge has thrown out a human rights lawsuit against Fethullah Gülen, an exiled Turkish cleric and head of a of multibillion-dollar network of businesses and nongovernmental organizations.

Asian Lawyer
Dentons Caught Up in Perceived Conflict of Interest in China

By Anna Zhang |

The world’s largest law firm by headcount is accused of dumping an alleged police brutality victim client, then taking on the police as a client in the same case.

Europe
Expert Analysis: Is Global Enforcement Parity the New Norm?

By Robert J. Jossen, Michael J. Gilbert and Hrishikesh N. Hari |

The specter of competition among international regulators makes it essential for these entities to develop and pursue a coordinated strategy for all such matters.

Volkswagen cars parked at a Volkswagen car dealership in Knoxville, TN.

Europe
For Sullivan & Cromwell and VW, a $14.7B Settlement Counts as a Win

By Jenna Greene |

When the jury foreman says “Not guilty,” that’s a defense win. When the judge dismisses a case on summary judgment, that’s a defense win. When your client agrees to a $14.7 billion settlement? For Sullivan & Cromwell and Volkswagen AG, yes, that’s a defense win too.

Europe
Brexit's Effect On GDPR, Privacy Shield Limited, But Many Eye Data Transfer Uncertainties

By Ricci Dipshan |

Given the late stages of Privacy Shield negotiations, and the long process of a Brexit, experts see little change to data privacy and transfer laws until Britain leaves.

Asian Lawyer
Apple Turns to Fangda Partners to Protect Its iPhone in China

By Anna Zhang |

Fangda Partners, a large China-based law firm headquartered in Shanghai with a strong intellectual property disputes practice, is representing Apple in its fight to reverse a recent ruling that threatens to ban sales of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus in Beijing.

Britain and EU flags

Europe
Tech Companies Face Mixed Impact from Brexit Vote

By Ed Silverstein |

While the ultimate impact of the UK's exit from the European Union remains unclear, attorneys are beginning to wade through the regulatory challenges that come in Brexit's wake

Corinne Ball

Asian Lawyer
Kaisa Effects Restructuring of U.S. Bonds Offshore

By Corinne Ball |

In her Distress Mergers and Acquisitions column, Corinne Ball of Jones Day writes: Defaults on onshore and offshore obligations by companies in Greater China, as well as other Emerging Markets, have been increasing. Restructuring of this debt via a scheme of arrangement in tandem with a U.S. bankruptcy case may present an effective restructuring mechanism for Emerging Market enterprises.

Asian Lawyer
E-Discovery and IG Efforts in China Hampered by Vague Regulations, Loyal Business Culture

By Ricci Dipshan |

Foreign Companies based in China face a host of social and legal challenges in discovery and corporate governance.

Emerging Markets
The Global Lawyer: To Dodge $50 Billion Bill, Russia Comes Clean on Sale of the Century

Mikhail Khodorkovsky and his friends once paid the Russian state roughly half a billion dollars for Yukos Oil Co., which was publicly valued at $6 billion in 1997. Russia then took back those assets. The controlling shareholders have fought Russia in arbitration ever since.

Enrique Pena Nieto

Latin America
Open Trials Come to Mexico After Yearslong Justice Reforms

By Christopher Sherman, Associated Press |

It would have seemed routine in many places: A defendant accused of illegally possessing a gun sat across a gleaming courtroom from the judge who accepted his guilty plea and would pronounce his sentence. For Mexico, though, it was a remarkable change from a century-old judicial system of paper-shuffling court cases in which defendants rarely actually testified before the judge ruling on their fate from within a cramped, bureaucrat's office. As of Saturday, the open, oral trial will be the norm nationwide as part of a sweeping judicial reform.

Christ the Redeemer on Corcovado mountain overlooking Rio De Janeiro. Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

Latin America
Brazil's Pre-Olympics Emergency Declaration Raises Legal Questions

A Brazilian state governor's declaration of a state of emergency and request for federal money to meet obligations in hosting the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro is being questioned on constitutional grounds and may lead to lawsuits, lawyers say.

The U.S. Supreme Court

Europe
Racketeering Law Applies Outside the U.S., With Limits, Justices Rule

By Marcia Coyle and Zoe Tillman |

The nation's chief law against racketeering applies to some activities outside of the United States, but private plaintiffs must claim a domestic injury, the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday ruled in a closely watched business case involving a major American cigarette and food producer.

Kremlin complex in Moscow

Europe
NJ Court OKs Russia as Forum for Real Estate Dispute

By Michael Booth |

A New Jersey appeals court has ruled that a clause in a contract that mandates that any dispute by resolved by Russians courts is enforceable, even though there is little likelihood that one of the parties will return to Russia to resolve the dispute.

Emerging Markets
Companies Are Turning to E-Discovery Technology for Global Compliance Investigations

By John Tredennick |

As many companies have already realized, the same technology used for e-discovery in litigation is equally adept at discovering evidence in compliance matters.

Original and counterfeit shoes at Sterne Kessler Goldstein & Fox. December 18, 2015.

Emerging Markets
To Fight Counterfeits, US Should Follow Canada's Lead

By Jennifer Williams-Alvarez |

In recent years, Canadian authorities have been cracking down on counterfeiting by using information from victims to close the bank accounts of the merchants selling counterfeit goods.

European Commission in Brussels

Europe
Expert Analysis: K Street in Europe

By Charles Borden, Sam Brown and Valentijn de Boe |

In this article, the twelfth in Allen & Overy's weekly columns on political law issues designed to help in-house legal and compliance personnel manage risks, we turn to lobbying regulation in the European Union.

Asian Lawyer
Key Lessons for GCs From Two FCPA Cases

By Sue Reisinger and Ed Silverstein |

The Justice Department revealed how it reached decisions under its new pilot enforcement program.

Asian Lawyer
Have Global Compliance Problems? You're Not Alone

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

The 2016 Global Business Ethics Survey, released Thursday by the Ethics & Compliance Initiative , revealed that more workers in Brazil, India and Russia reported seeing misconduct and experiencing pressure to compromise standards than their counterparts in 10 other countries.

French police officers look over a piece of debris from a plane in Saint-Andre, Reunion Island, on July 29, 2015. The wing was later found to be from missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 that went missing March 8, 2014, with 239 people aboard while flying from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

Asian Lawyer
Paths to Legal Relief in Malaysia Flight Disappearance Prove Elusive

By Amanda Bronstad |

The location and cause of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370's disappearance two years ago continues to prove elusive, but that hasn't stopped plaintiffs lawyers from pursuing novel and, at times conflicting, legal theories in U.S. courts on behalf of the families of the deceased.

Emerging Markets
Deceptive Pricing Litigation Grows in Canada

By Stephanie Forshee |

The twin sister rental car companies Aviscar Inc. and Budgetcar Inc. were handed a $3.25 million penalty on June 2 by the Canadian Competition Bureau for alleged deceptive pricing practices in Canada.

Europe
European Data Protection Supervisor Suggests Path After Parliament Dismisses Privacy Shield Draft

By Ricci Dipshan |

Experts in the U.S. see many of the recommendations, which focus on mass surveillance, data rights and enforcement, as too far-reaching.

Lisa Hobbs, partner, Kuhn Hobbs, Austin

Asian Lawyer
Texas Supreme Court Allows $1.29M Legal Mal Case Against DLA Piper to Proceed

By John Council |

The Texas Supreme Court has ruled that an Australian businessman has standing to sue DLA Piper, giving him a shot at recovering a $1.29 million jury verdict he won against the huge multinational law firm after the judgment was thrown out by an intermediate court of appeals.

Asian Lawyer
Huawei’s Lawsuit Against Samsung Illustrates Key Issues in Smartphone Patent Conflicts

By Ed Silverstein |

The patent infringement lawsuit highlights major similarities and differences with other recent smartphone legal disputes.

Latin America
Luck Turns for Brazilian Tourist Suing Security Guards

By Celia Ampel |

A Brazilian tourist's case against Miami Beach security guards is reinstated after he shows he made a good-faith effort to return to the U.S. for the civil assault trial.

Arab Bank headquarters in Amman, Jordan

Emerging Markets
Damages Judgment Clears Way for Arab Bank Appeal

By Andrew Keshner |

A federal judge entered a $100 million damages award in a terrorism financing case against Arab Bank but paused enforcement, clearing the way for the bank to appeal an underlying liability verdict.

Asian Lawyer
Australian Agency Pitches Patent Case to U.S. Supreme Court

By Ben Hancock |

The appeal could make new law on patent damages—where it's badly needed, according to Kobre & Kim partner Michael Ng.

Europe
Alphabet Board Sued Over EU Antitrust Charges

By Ben Hancock |

A shareholder derivative suit alleges that leaders of Alphabet and its subsidiary Google left the company exposed.

Lolloj/iStockphoto

Emerging Markets
Probes by Dechert, Sullivan & Cromwell Draw Scrutiny

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The law firms who carried out investigations for Eurasian Natural Resources Corp. and Standard Chartered Bank have recently found their roles questioned. It's a reminder that firms hired to do internal probes must walk a tightrope between pleasing clients and regulators.

Jeremy H. Temkin

Asian Lawyer
Expert Analysis: Accessing Records With Bank of Nova Scotia Summonses

By Jeremy H. Temkin |

Through Bank of Nova Scotia summonses, the IRS seeks to compel U.S. branches of foreign banks to produce records held by their overseas branches, even when production would otherwise be proscribed by foreign bank secrecy laws. This law enforcement tool has been used rarely over the past three decades, but in today's regulatory climate, practitioners representing taxpayers need to be aware of their availability.

Europe
TAR in the UK: In First Contest Over Use, Court Allows Predictive Coding

By Ian Lopez |

The decision comes months after the English High Court’s first approval of predictive coding.

Asian Lawyer
Lawmakers Seek to Make NJ International Hub for ADR

By Michael Booth |

New Jersey lawmakers are considering legislation that would make the state a center for international alternative dispute resolution.

Latin America
Judge Reverses Ship Seizure, Awards $1.2 Million in Damages

By Celia Ampel |

A Dania Beach lawyer wins a defense judgment and $1.2 million in damages for a Hollywood company whose ship was seized in Panama at the behest of an Orlando shipping company.

Asian Lawyer
Citing Cyberespionage, U.S. Steel Seeks China Import Ban through IP Trade Law

By Ricci Dipshan |

Breached by Chinese officials in 2010 and 2011, U.S. Steel is pushing back against appropriation of its stolen trade secrets.

The U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C.

Emerging Markets
The Global Lawyer: Terror Plaintiffs Still Have Friends in Washington

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

After taking the Saudis' best punch, the 9/11 bill passes the Senate unanimously.

Latin America
Judge Tosses Shareholder Suit over Wal-Mart Bribery Claims

By Sue Reisinger |

Attorney Stuart Grant must be spitting nails after a Delaware judge dismissed his shareholder suit against the directors of Wal-Mart Stores Inc. over the allegations of bribery in Mexico, because an Arkansas court—without the documents Grant turned up—has already ruled.

Europe
U.K. Plans More Anti-Corruption Laws

By Sue Reisinger |

The latest proposal would extend the “failure to prevent” offense to include money laundering and perhaps other economic crimes.

The Venezuelan government is trying to silence website dolartoday.com, based in Delaware, that publishes that nation’s black market currency rate. Publication of unofficial exchange rates is a crime in Venezuela..

Latin America
Venezuelan Suit Dismissed Against Financial Website

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

A Delaware federal judge dismisses the central bank of Venezuela's lawsuit against a U.S. website publishing exchange rates and Venezuelan opposition news.

Man working in a gold mine in Gold Reef City, South Africa.

Emerging Markets
U.S. Plaintiffs Firms Notch a Win as South African Class Action Gets the Green Light

By Julie Triedman |

Hausfeld LLP and Motley Rice are playing big roles in litigation on behalf of more than a half-million South African miners sickened with silicosis and tuberculosis. On May 13 a court in Johannesburg ruled that the massive suit could move forward.

77.69 acre lot at 5001 Vanguard St. in Orlando, sold in 2005 for $16.6 million.

Latin America
Ecuador Wins $4 Million Award Against Company With Orlando Real Estate

By Monika Gonzalez Mesa |

Ecuador is entitled to $4.3 million from a company that owns a 77-acre Orlando property linked to a 20-year-old bank fraud case.

Emerging Markets
The Global Lawyer: The 'Zombie' Alien Tort, Three Years After Kiobel

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

In 2016, the corporate alien tort is more alive than dead.

Asian Lawyer
A Smooth Landing for Air Cargo Suit

By Jenna Greene |

After $1.2 billion in settlements and a decade of litigation that swept in antitrust lawyers from more than 50 firms (seriously, did anyone NOT work on this case?), the massive air cargo price fixing litigation is coming in for a landing.

Asian Lawyer
Big Pharma Gets a Big Win in India

By Lisa Shuchman |

India may be showing signs that it no longer wants to be Big Pharma’s public enemy No. 1.

U.S. Department of Justice building in Washington, D.C.

Emerging Markets
Firms Cash In on Anti-Bribery Expertise Amid Litigation Slowdown

By Julie Triedman |

Europe
A Schrems Aftershock? Debating Challenges to EU Standard Contractual Clauses

By Ricci Dipshan |

As EU officials consider shortcomings in the standard contractual clauses, many wonder if legal challenges or regulatory changes are on the horizon.

Latin America
Controversy Erupts Over Brazil’s Temporary Blockage of WhatsApp

By Ed Silverstein |

‘We will be having similar debates in the U.S. before long,’ warns Stanford’s Vivek Wadhwa.

Europe
U.S. Trade Rep Calls Out China, India and…Switzerland (!?) Over IP Laws

By Lisa Shuchman |

The U.S. Trade Representative’s Office has added an unexpected culprit to the list of nations that it says fall down on protecting IP: Switzerland, the land of chocolate and cuckoo clocks.

Asian Lawyer
The Pitfalls of Private-Label Selling

By Stephanie Forshee |

American entrepreneurs buy Chinese goods to sell, but lose out on patent protection.

The Appellate Division, First Department, at 27 Madison Ave.

Asian Lawyer
Panel Finds NY, Not London, Is Proper Forum for Dispute

By Ben Bedell |

New York's First Department said that a forum selection clause in the earlier of four agreements between a Kazakh oligarch and his former financial advisor designating New York courts for the resolution of disputes controlled the matter, even though later agreements cancelled the earlier one.

In this Sunday, Oct. 23, 1983, file photo, service members search through rubble after a suicide truck bomb attack on the U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut, Lebanon. The blast _ the single deadliest attack on U.S. forces abroad since World War II _ claimed the lives of 241 American service members. - AP Photo/Jim Bourdier

Emerging Markets
Lawyers for Beirut Bombing Victims Finally Close In On Recovery

By Julie Triedman |

Many of the original plaintiffs didn’t live to see their attorneys prevail at the U.S. Supreme Court, but hundreds of terror victims and their family members are finally close to collecting from Iran.

Page Pate

Asian Lawyer
Whistleblower Suit Over Chinese Imports Settles for $15 Million

By R. Robin McDonald |

The U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday that it has secured $15 million from a California-based furniture chain to resolve claims that it improperly evaded anti-dumping duties on wooden bedroom furniture imported from China.

Brunsbüttel Nuclear Power Plant was among the German plants that were taken offline by Angela Merkel’s nuclear power phaseout in 2011.

Europe
Germany's Nuclear Reaction

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The country's decision to phase out nuclear power has triggered a chain reaction of litigation and arbitration. What will be the fallout for cross-border dispute resolution in Europe?

Navio Joao Candido, Petrobras Oil Tanker

Latin America
Amid Scandal, Brazil Overhauls Its Anti-Corruption Toolkit

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Brazil's leniency program needs work. Will proposed reforms do the job? The country must balance purity and pragmatism, writes The Global Lawyer.

Latin America
Ex-Informant Who Won $1.9M From Feds is Sued Over Legal Fees

By Zoe Tillman |

Washington, D.C.-boutique Alvarez Martinez Law Firm claims that a former confidential informant for U.S. law enforcement in Colombia is refusing to safeguard $731,500 in contested legal fees from a $1.9 million settlement reached last month with the feds.

Latin America
Attorney Uses the Fifth Circuit to Get U.S. Documents for Mexican Lawsuit

By John Council |

The ruling comes after Grupo Mexico chased an evasive litigation investment company all over the United States with a federal subpoena.