Latin America Top News

Barack Obama.

Obama Charm Offensive Targets Venezuela After Iranians, Cubans

The Obama administration's charm offensive with unfriendly states has rolled through Myanmar, Iran and Cuba. Next stop: Venezuela.

Brazil
Brands Face Legal Hurdles Ahead of 2016 Summer Olympics

By Lisa Shuchman |

Official sponsors of the XXXI Olympiad in Rio are already making grand plans, and brand owners who are not official sponsors had better watch out.

Intercontinental Conundrum: Navigating Litigation Holds

By Caroline Mitchell and David DiMeglio |

Companies facing incidents that might attract international attention must assess whether U.S. litigation is reasonably anticipated, thus triggering the need for a litigation hold.

Marco Rubio

Cuba
Attorney Chides Rubio for Insisting on U.S.-Cuba Trade Embargo

By Adolfo Garcia |

Attorney Adolfo Garcia takes U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio to task for his continued support for the Cuban embargo.

Tim Lobanov

Despite Chinese Growth, Miami Investors Mostly Latin American

By Jennifer LeClaire |

Tim Lobanov, managing director of Verasca Group, shares his thoughts on the foreign investment coming into the Miami market.

Uber iPhone app.

Mexico
Uber Cars Bashed in Mexico, Cabbies Protest Ride-Booking Apps

A raucous crowd attacked Uber drivers and their vehicles with clubs and stones outside the Mexico City airport, the company said, as licensed taxi drivers demonstrated to demand a "total halt" to app-based ride-booking services in the capital.

Cuba
Special Report: Cuba

By Julie Kay |

For more than a year, no bank was willing to become Cuba's official bank in the United States--until a small community bank based in Pompano Beach stepped up.

Peru
Peru Decrees Warrantless Geolocation Tracking of Cellphones

Peru's government ordered telecommunications companies to grant police warrantless access to cellphone users' locations and other call data in real time and store that data for three years, a decree that civil libertarians called an unconstitutional invasion of privacy.

Peru
Sentencing Should Not Rely on Immigration Status, Panel Says

By Andrew Denney |

The Second Department ruled the trial court should not have reasoned that sentencing Luis Cesar to probation would present an "ethical problem" because Cesar is an undocumented immigrant and "condition number one of any sentence of probation is not to violate any laws."

Cuba
McDermott Partners With Spanish Firm for Foray Into Cuba

By Nell Gluckman |

McDermott Will & Emery has become the latest Am Law 100 firm to target opportunities stemming from the renewal of U.S. diplomatic relations with Cuba, forging an alliance with Spanish firm Olleros Abogados to advise clients on Cuba-related matters from Madrid.

Spain, Cuba
McDermott Partners With Spanish Firm for Foray Into Cuba

By Nell Gluckman |

McDermott Will & Emery has become the latest Am Law 100 firm to target opportunities stemming from the renewal of U.S. diplomatic relations with Cuba, forging an alliance with Spanish firm Olleros Abogados to advise clients on Cuba-related matters from Madrid.

Peter Berlowe and Daniel Vielleville

Venezuela
She Left Cargill and Got Severance. Problem Was, it Wasn't Paid in US Dollars

By Julie Kay |

Attorneys Daniel Vielleville and Peter Berlowe represent a Weston resident who received a severance package in Venezuelan bolivars instead of dollars.

Puerto Ricans Stuggle, Moving to Central Florida

Almost 1 million Puerto Ricans live in Florida, with about 400,000 living in central Florida, and Florida will soon rival New York as the state with the most Puerto Ricans.

Uber headquarters in San Francisco

Mexico
Uber’s Legal Woes: Ride-Sharing Service Facing Fresh Legal Obstacles in Mexico

By Juliana Kenny |

Uber continues to face legal challenges abroad — something the ride-sharing company has done since its outset, but with recent pushback from France and Mexico.

Cuba
Visitors Flock to Havana Since US, Cuba Establish Ties

With Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro making global headlines for restarting diplomatic relations between their countries after five decades, 2015 is shaping up to be a record year for the Cuban tourism industry.

Dominican Republic
Many Leave Dominican Republic for Haiti to Avoid Deportation

Thousands of people from Haiti or merely of Haitian descent aren't waiting to see if they'll be forcibly removed from the Dominican Republic now that the deadline has passed to apply for legal residency.

EB-5 Funding Is Turning Miami China-Centric

By Ronald R. Fieldstone |

Chinese investors accept a rate of return on their invested capital as low as 0.5 of a percent to get the certainty of job creation and green card approval, writes attorney Ronald Fieldstone.

Mexico
Dismay in US Over Guzman's Escape From Mexican Prison

Reactions in the United States to the escape from Mexican prison of a reputed drug lord ranged from disbelief to outrage, with some observers saying it dramatically illustrated the need for captured cartel kingpins to be promptly extradited to the U.S.

Judge Lohier

Dominican Republic
Disparity in Citizenship Law Is Found Unconstitutional

By Mark Hamblett |

Immigration law that requires unwed fathers to live in the United States longer than unwed mothers when considering their children born abroad for citizenship is unconstitutional, the Second Circuit ruled Wednesday.

NYC City Council Speaker: Washington Must Help Puerto Rico

New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, who is arguably becoming one of the nation's most influential Puerto Rican politicians, is urging Congress and the Obama administration to step in and help the island commonwealth struggling under the weight of its debt.

Managua, Nicaragua

Nicaragua
Littler Lands in Nicaragua

By Jennifer Henderson |

Littler Mendelson has expanded to Nicaragua, with the July 1 launch of an office in the Central American nation's capital of Managua by Littler Global member BDS Asesores.

Carnival's Adonia, which carries 710 passengers, is part of its Fathom line.

Cuba
Carnival to Launch Miami to Cuba Cruises in May

By Celia Ampel |

Carnival Corp. plans to offer trips from Miami to Cuba, becoming the first American cruise company to visit that island since the 1960 trade embargo.

Mexico
A Year On, Children Caught on Border Struggle to Stay, Adapt

At 1-year-old, a wide-eyed, restless Joshua Tinoco faces the prospect of deportation to his native Honduras, one of tens of thousands of children who arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border last year.

Pope Francis

Pope Francis Brings Focus on Poor to South America

Pope Francis arrived in Ecuador Sunday, starting a nine-day visit to South America in which he's expected to focus on the poor and challenge policies on oil drilling that damage the environment.

Kimberly Cook holds the bible for her husband Ramón A. Abadin as he is sworn into the president of the Florida Bar by Chief Justice Jorge Labarga.

Cuba
Cuban-American Florida Bar President Plans Cuba Trip

By Julie Kay |

Newly installed Florida Bar president Ramon Abadin is planning an attorney trip to his native Cuba but won't be making the tourist stops taken on the international law section's visit.

Uber iPhone app.

Mexico
Government Officials Hint at Possible Win for Uber in Mexico City

Times are tough for Uber in many parts of the world, from a recent California ruling that its drivers cannot be classified as contractors to a Paris taxi protest that became a riot and led France's president to promise a crackdown. But the smartphone-based ride-sharing app may soon get some good news in Mexico City.

Cuban flag hangs in the doorway to the Museo de Arte Colonial.

Cuba
US Embassy in Havana Marks 'New Chapter'

President Barack Obama announced the U.S. and Cuba will reopen their embassies in Havana and Washington

2015 Arbitration Scorecard: Highest Stakes

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The 10 biggest disputes from our 2015 survey, ranked by the amount in controversy.

2015 Arbitration Scorecard: Deciding the World's Biggest Disputes

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Our survey finds more billion-dollar cases than ever—and they’re being heard by the same tiny club of arbitrators.

Cuba
Cuba's Popularity Concerns Caribbean Tourism Officials

By Danica Coto |

Caribbean tourism officials are pushing for a partnership with the U.S. government because of concerns that warming relations between the U.S. and Cuba will result in a significant loss of visitors to the rest of the region.

Panama
Noriega Asks for Panama's Forgiveness in Jailhouse Interview

By Juan Zamorano and Joshua Goodman |

Former dictator Manuel Noriega broke a long silence to ask his compatriots to forgive actions by his military regime that culminated in the 1989 U.S. invasion.

Cuba
Review Board Weighs Release of Injured Guantanamo Prisoner

A Libyan prisoner at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, with battlefield wounds made his initial appearance before a review board that will decide whether he can be released after 13 years in custody.

Colombia
Report: Colombia Generala Go Unpunished in Civilian Killings

By Joshua Goodman |

Dozens of senior Colombian army officers implicated in the killing of 3,000 civilians falsely claimed to be rebels a decade ago have risen through the ranks and are escaping punishment for their roles in one of Latin America's worst atrocities, Human Rights Watch said.

Cuba
Close But No Cigar: US-Cuba Wrangle on Embassies 6 Months On

Six months ago, Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro stunned the world by announcing an end to their nations' half-century of official hostility. Yet, even as observers say a deal is imminent, the two governments have not taken the important but symbolic step of turning their "interests" offices into formal embassies in Havana and Washington.

Steven Donziger outside the Manhattan federal courthouse in April

Ecuador
Suit Against Donziger Belongs in Ecuador, Panel Determines

By Ben Bedell |

Ecuador, not New York, is the proper venue for a group of indigenous Ecuadorians to sue New York attorney Steven Donziger, who they claim is cheating them out of their fair share of a judgment in the long-running dispute against Chevron, the First Department ruled Tuesday.

Venezuela
As Struggling Professors Flee, Higher Education Suffers in Venezuela

Venezuela has already lost many of its brightest young professionals to better-paying jobs abroad, and now the South American country is also losing the professors who trained them.

Honduras
Honduras Escapes $205M Award on Lumber Contract

By Celia Ampel |

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit decides Honduras isn't liable for a $205 million default judgment against a company it created.

St. Peter's Basilica

Cuba
Vatican Indicts Ex-Ambassador to Dominican Republic

The Vatican's former ambassador to the Dominican Republic has been indicted on charges he sexually abused young boys in the Caribbean country and had child pornography on his computer and will stand trial next month in a Vatican court.

Venezuela
Jailed Venezuela Opposition Leader Calls Off Hunger Strike

Jailed Venezuela opposition leader Daniel Ceballos called off his hunger strike Thursday after 20 days.

Housing in Havana, Cuba

Cuba
Republican Senator Sees US Embassy in Havana Coming Soon

The opening of a U.S. embassy in Cuba for the first in 54 years is "imminent," a U.S. senator said as he and two other Republicans finished a short visit to Cuba said.

02/18/14-- Miami-- Tim Gifford,Senior Vice President, with CBRE

Mexico
REITs Open Up Mexico Markets

By Samantha Joseph |

Just a few years ago, Mexico's real estate investors were in an exclusive club: wealthy, independent and private buyers who took their pick of the choice inventory and controlled the lion's share of the country's commercial properties. That's changed.

Cuba
Cuba Work Skyrockets

By Carlos Harrison |

Law firms are trumpeting their Cuba teams and hosting events to explore the island's risks and opportunities.

Mexico
Deals and More Deals as Mexico Finally Opens

By Susan Postlewaite |

International and Mexican law firms are riding a wave of new deals as Mexico moves ahead with bold plans to open its national energy sector to foreign and private investment for the first time in 76 years.

Jerry Brodsky

Brazil
Layer Keeps Rio Olympics on Track

Miami attorney Jerry Brodsky was tapped to set up dispute boards to keep the Rio Olympics construction on schedule.

FBI Beefs up FCPA Teams

By Kathleen Baydala Joyner |

The Justice Department is adding to its enforcement arsenal by tripling the number of agents working on cases.

Cuba

Cuba
Cuba's Risks or Rewards?

By Carlos Harrison |

Experts warn the foreign investors will be looking for a functional legal system and a willingness to take disputes to international arbitration before they will invest big dollars in Cuba.

House confiscated by the Castro regime that once belonged to the family of Attorney Jesus Suarez, with Genovese Joblove & Battista.

Cuba
Back in Time: Attorneys Visit Their Families' Former Homes in Cuba Before Castro (Slideshow)

By Julie Kay |

For a handful of Cuban-American attorneys visiting Cuba with a Florida Bar delegation, the trip was a journey to their roots.

Paraguay
Former South American Soccer Boss Mired in FIFA Scandal

The era of grand privileges and immunity for the soccer confederation appears to be coming to an end in Paraguay, a poor, landlocked nation of 6.8 million, where smuggling, corruption and tax evasion are endemic. Nicholas Leoz, now 86, was one of 14 people indicted by the U.S. Justice Department last week on charges of bribery, racketeering and money laundering.

Colombia
In Bribery and FCPA Trial of CEO, GC Says They Did It

By Sue Reisinger |

Gregory Weisman, the former general counsel of PetroTiger, has testified that he participated in a secret deal with sellers of a company who offered kickbacks to Weisman and PetroTiger's then-CEO.

Venezuela
Jailed Mayors' Hunger Strike Rallies Venezuelan Opposition

A hunger strike by two high-profile imprisoned politicians is generating excitement among some members of a Venezuelan opposition that has seemed mostly disengaged since 2014's fiery protests.

Capitol building in Havana

Cuba
Cuban Investment on Horizon. But Is It Worth the Risk?

By Julie Kay |

About 30 lawyers from the international law section of the Florida Bar who went on a fact-finding mission to Cuba returned to the United States with concerns about investment opportunities.

Vendor selling pork rinds in Havana

Cuba
Havana Streets, a Reporter's View (Slideshow)

DBR reporter Julie Kay recently took a trip to Cuba with about 30 lawyers from the International Section of the Florida Bar. These are the photos she took.

Colombia
DLA Piper Expands to Colombia With Martinez Neira

By Julie Kay |

London-based DLA Piper expands to Colombia under a cooperative agreement with Martinez Neira Abogados, one of the country's leading law firms.

Cuba
US. Journalism Courses Rile Cuba Amid Effort to Heal Rift

About 30 Cubans sit in a conference room for several hours each week and learn the ABCs of journalism: how to craft a news story, write a headline and check sources. To their government, however, they are taking part in criminal activity.

Julie Kay

Cuba
She Learned Firsthand Just How Lacking in Basic Freedoms Cuba is

By Julie Kay |

Review reporter Julie Kay shadowed lawyers touring Cuba last week. Kay had a few tense moments when was kicked off the tour and told by the government to stop writing during her visit.

Cuba
A Frank Assessment on Cuba From Its Longest Serving Correspondent

By Julie Kay |

Marc Frank, the longest serving foreign correspondent in Cuba, delivered a candid assessment of the Cuban political system to lawyers visiting Cuba from the Florida Bar International Section.

Attorney Osvaldo Miranda Diaz provides an overview of the Cuban legal system describing the role of lawyers in Cuba and the legal services provided at his firm, Cuban Law Collective.

Cuba
Strong Words From Havana Lawyer on Cuba's Legal System: 'Disgusting'

By Julie Kay |

Havana attorney Osvaldo Miranda Diaz told a 30-attorney delegation from Florida that Cuban lawyers get tired of complaining to government officials about the lack of due process in Cuba's courts.

Third District Court of Appeal

Venezuela
3rd DCA Demands Deposition from Venezuelan Oil Magnate

By Samantha Joseph |

The Third District Court of Appeal unanimously denied a motion for a protective order to prevent deposition of a Venezuelan oil magnate in Miami malpractice lawsuit.

Cuba
US Senator in Cuba Says Normal Relations 'Weeks Away'

The historic process of restoring long-severed diplomatic relationships between the U.S. and Cuba that began Dec. 17 will likely come to a successful end in a matter of weeks, a U.S. senator said during a visit to the island.

Cuba
Stunning 36 Percent Rise in US Visits to Cuba Since January

The thaw in relations between the U.S. and Cuba has led to a stunning 36 percent increase in visits by Americans to the island, including thousands who are flying into Cuba from third countries such as Mexico in order to sidestep U.S. restrictions on tourism.

Puerto Rico Gov Files $9.8B Budget That Calls for Deep Cuts

Puerto Rico's governor submitted a $9.8 billion budget proposal calling for $674 million in cuts amid the U.S. territory's economic crisis.

Cuba
Cuba Establishes Banking Relationship in US

President Barack Obama wants a guarantee that U.S. diplomats can travel wherever they want on Cuba and meet whomever they please.

Brazil
Paul Hastings’ São Paulo Hire Sticks With Allen & Overy

By Nell Gluckman |

About two months after Paul Hastings announced that it would open a São Paulo office with three laterals from Allen & Overy, one of those partners has decided to stay put. Bruno Soares, the only one of the three who is actually based in Brazil, will remain with Allen & Overy.

United Kingdom, Brazil
Paul Hastings’ São Paulo Hire Sticks With Allen & Overy

By Nell Gluckman |

About two months after Paul Hastings announced that it would open a São Paulo office with three laterals from Allen & Overy, one of those A&O partners has decided to stay put.

Down Arrow

Debt-Choked Puerto Rico at Fiscal Brink as Bond Buyers Pull Back

Puerto Rico is hurtling toward the fiscal brink. After years of borrowing to paper over deficits, and with $630 million due to investors on July 1, the island may confront the unthinkable: a default.

Venezuela
Venezuela's Inflation Rate Is 200% and Credit Card Companies Are Cashing In

Venezuela's economic collapse is driving factories out of business, leaving store shelves barren and wiping out workers' purchasing power. But MasterCard Inc. is doing just fine.

Mexico
Mexico to Give $3.3M to Victims of Army Slayings, Relatives

The Mexican government said it will give at least $3.3 million to relatives of criminal suspects slain in 2014 by soldiers under a Mexican law requiring compensation for victims of human rights violations.

Ford Motor Company Headquarters in Dearborn, Michigan.

Venezuela
Ford to Sell Venezuelan Cars in Greenbacks in Dollarization

Ford Motor Co. will sell some of its cars in Venezuela in dollars to alleviate a shortage of greenbacks that has slashed its imports and paralyzed its plant, according to a labor union official.

Raul Castro

Cuba
Raul Castro Was So Impressed With Pope Francis, He Actually Said This

Cuban President Raul Castro paid a call Sunday on Pope Francis at the Vatican to thank him for working for Cuban-U.S. detente—and said he was so impressed by the pontiff he is considering a return to the Catholic church's fold.

People celebrate near the Congress building after learning that Guatemala’s Vice President Roxana Baldetti resigned amid a customs corruption scandal.

Guatemala
Guatemala Wiretaps Lead to Fraud, Bribery Cases in Government

Wiretappings that prosecutors used to track down a million-dollar fraud ring run out of the Guatemalan government have cost the vice president her job and now may lead to the Central American country's Supreme Court.

Nicolas Maduro

Colombia, Venezuela
Venezuela's Poor Neighbors Flee en Masse Years After Arrival

Colombian immigrants, who greatly benefited from the socialist policies of Chavez and Maduro, are heading home as the Venezuelan economy tanks.

Mexico
Mexican Drug Cartel Jalisco New Generation Flexes Muscles

An increasingly strong drug cartel known as Jalisco New Generation was showing off its power with a spasm of violence that killed seven people and forced down a military helicopter in western Mexico, analysts said.

Puerto Rico Governore Signs Order to Legalize Medical Pot

Puerto Rico's governor signed an executive order authorizing the use of medical marijuana in the U.S. territory in an unexpected move following a lengthy public debate.

Uruguay
Uruguay Urges Ex-Guantanamo Detainees to Sign for Housing

Uruguay's foreign minister said that six former Guantanamo Bay detainees resettled here will be out of a house and off public assistance unless they agree to terms they have so far rejected, the latest in an increasingly public battle over who is financially responsible for the men and for how long.

Mexico
Mexico Officials Investigate Case of Girl Wrongly Sent to US

Prosecutors have launched an investigation of possible criminal conduct in the case of a 14-year-old girl mistakenly sent to the U.S. to live with a woman who claimed to be her mother, authorities said.

Honduras
Honduras High Court Voids Ban on Presidential Re-Election

Honduras' Supreme Court on Thursday voided an article in the constitution limiting presidents to a single term—the issue at the heart of the political conflict that led to the ouster of socialist President Manuel Zelaya six years ago when he sought to hold a referendum on rewriting the constitution.

Gibson Dunn's Theodore Olson outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2013.

Ecuador
The Global Lawyer: Will Chevron Lose in the Second Circuit?

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Ted Olson didn't quite live up to his legend in April 20 arguments over the $9.5 billion Ecuadorean judgment against Chevron. The question is whether Chevron blew the case.

Colombia
Professional Liars Are Undermining Justice in Colombia

Authorities have taken to calling it the "cartel of false witnesses," with paid liars sometimes testifying in dozens of cases at a time, parading from courtroom to courtroom.

700 South Florida Electronics Companies Under Scrutiny for Drug Laundering

By Eleazar David Melendez |

Looking to squeeze a money-laundering scheme favored by drug cartels, federal orders have placed nearly 700 South Florida import-export businesses under tighter scrutiny.

Ford

Mexico
Low Wages, Trade Deals Lure Auto Plants to Mexico

Mexico has become the most attractive place in North America to build new automobile factories, a shift that has siphoned jobs from the United States and Canada, yet helped keep car and truck prices in check for consumers.

Venezuela
Wall St. Has No Idea How Much Money Venezuela Has

Bond investors suspect the Venezuelan government is pretty low on cash. Just how low, though, is a tricky question.

Otto Perez Molina, President of Guatemala

Guatemala
UN Anti-Crime Panel's Future Uncertain in Guatemala

President Otto Perez Molina says he will decide soon whether Guatemala will continue cooperating with U.N. International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala or hand its responsibilities over to local law enforcement.

Steven Donziger appears at a press conference last March in Quito, Ecuador.

Ecuador
The Global Lawyer: Chevron, Donziger and Human Rights 101

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

For the author of "Human Rights in a Nutshell," the lessons of Chevron are pretty simple: "Advocates for human rights do not advance human rights by violating them."

Cuba
US and Cuba Open Talks on Two of America's Most Wanted Fugitives

The U.S. and Cuba will open talks about two of America's most-wanted fugitives as part of a new dialogue about law-enforcement cooperation made possible by President Barack Obama's decision to remove Cuba from a list of state sponsors of terror, the State Department announced.

Cuba
Ex-Colombia Ministers Convicted of Bribes on Behalf of Uribe

Colombia's Supreme Court convicted two close aides of former President Alvaro Uribe of bribing lawmakers to support the conservative leader's 2006 re-election.

Chile
Chile President Bachelet Signs Same-Sex Civil Union Law

Chilean President Michelle Bachelet signed a law that recognizes civil unions between same-sex couples, a sign of change in a country long regarded as one South America's most socially conservative nations.

Cuba
Obama to Remove Cuba from State Sponsor of Terror List

President Barack Obama will remove Cuba from the list of state sponsors of terrorism, the White House announced, a key step in his bid to normalize relations between the two countries.

Dilma Rousseff

Brazil
Protests Across Brazil Seek Ouster of President Rousseff

Nationwide demonstrations calling for the impeachment of President Dilma Rousseff swept Brazil for the second day in less than a month, though turnout at Sunday's protests appeared down, prompting questions about the future of the movement.

Cuba
Akerman Advises on Airbnb's Foray into Cuba

By Nell Gluckman |

The short-term rental service is one of the first companies to take advantage of the loosening of regulations that for decades prohibited Americans from doing business in the island nation. Akerman partner Augusto Maxwell, who heads the firm's Cuba practice, worked to make the move happen for Airbnb.

El Salvador
Homicides in El Salvador Reach Record as Gang Violence Grows

By Marcos Aleman and Alberto Arce |

El Salvador had more homicides in March than any other single month in a decade, a dark milestone that some attribute to the collapse of a gang truce and one that could mark a trend of greater violence to come.

Chile
Jailed Chilean Billionaires' Fortune Has Roots in Pinochet's Days

By Blake Schmidt Bloomberg News |

A corruption investigation involving two Chilean tycoons has put a spotlight on the fortune they started amassing during the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet.

Cuba
Poll: Cubans Expect US Detente to Improve Economic Lives

By Michael Weissenstein Associated Press |

Cubans overwhelmingly expect detente with the United States to alter their widely disliked economic system, according to a rare poll of 1,200 people across the island.

Argentina
Argentina Sues Citibank Over Recent Agreement With Holdouts

By Peter Prengaman |

The Argentine government said it was suing Citibank, the latest in an escalating proxy fight related to a legal battle over paying back the South American country's long-standing debt.

Panama
Panama's President an Unlikely Champion for Clean Government

By Joshua Goodman and Juan Zamorano |

President Juan Carlos Varela is an unlikely champion of clean government in Panama.

Cuba
Cuba-US Warming Held Up by Listing of Cuba as Terror Sponsor

By Michael Weissenstein and Bradley Klapper |

American hopes of opening an embassy in Havana before presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro meet at a regional summit this week have been snarled in disputes about Cuba's presence on the U.S. list of state sponsors of terror and U.S. diplomats' freedom to travel and talk to ordinary Cubans without restriction, officials say.

Fidel Castro

Cuba
Fidel Castro Appears in Public in Cuba

Former longtime Cuban president Fidel Castro has appeared in public for the first time in more than a year, official media reported.

Cuba

Cuba
What If? Trademarks and a Possible End to the Cuban Embargo

By David Friedland |

With monumental changes on the horizon as diplomatic discussions focus on the potential end of the U.S. trade embargo with Cuba, one of the issues to watch is trademarks.

Dilma Rousseff

Brazil
How Brazil's President Plans to Get Country, Herself Out of This Mess

Brazil President Dilma Rousseff is battling to regain the trust of voters and global investors alike as the economy sinks and a corruption scandal deepens. On Tuesday she charted what she hopes is a path to recovery.

Robert Menendez.

Dominican Republic
Exclusive Dominican Resort Tied to Senator's Indictment

A Dominican Republic resort long known as an exclusive Caribbean hideaway, where at least three former U.S. presidents have played golf, is one of the main settings in the corruption scandal enveloping Sen. Bob Menendez.

Cuba
On Cuban Isle Once Home to Americans, a Look Back and Ahead

Relations between Cuba and the U.S. are beginning to warm up again, and perhaps the long absence of Americans from Cuba and the Isle of Youth may be coming to an end.