Asian Disputes

Hiroshi Shimizu, Senior Vice President of Global Quality Assurance at Takata Corporation, answers questions during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing titled “Examining Takata Airbag Defects and the Vehicle Recall Process.”  November 20, 2014.

Japan
U.S. Senators Call on Takata to Probe Air Bag Defect

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Japanese auto parts company is under pressure by politicians to initiate an independent investigation into a deadly air bag safety defect, following a news report that it covered up the problem.

Andrew Levander (L), David Bernick (R)

Japan
Dechert's Lateral Hires Take Lead for Troubled Takata

By Brian Baxter |

The embattled Japanese auto parts company has retained a high-powered defense team from Dechert to handle a criminal probe, congressional inquiry and class action litigation related to a growing scandal into defective airbags.

Toyota Motor Corp.'s showroom in Tokyo.

Japan
Regulators Extend Takata Recall to Entire U.S.

By Amanda Bronstad |

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced a nationwide recall of cars and trucks with air bags made by the Japanese company. The recall, limited to vehicles with Takata air bags on the driver's side, came after an air bag ruptured in an incident outside a region of high humidity. The previous Takata recalls of 7.8 million vehicles were limited to those states in hot and humid climates.

Japan
Takata Called to Capitol Hill Over Air Bag Safety

By Andrew Ramonas |

Senators plan to put Takata Corp. under the microscope, holding a hearing on the Japanese company's air bag safety defect that allegedly caused five deaths and prompted a U.S. criminal investigation and class action lawsuits.

China, India, Russia
Are Your Brands Safe in China, India and Russia?

By Lisa Shuchman |

A company’s brands are among its most important assets. But a new survey shows that corporate executives and legal departments charged with protecting those assets consider their brands to be most vulnerable in China, India and Russia.

Malaysia, Singapore
Malaysia Won $1.2B Arbitration Against Singapore

By Anna Zhang |

The Southeast Asian neighbors both agreed to accept the decision and proceed with the development delayed for 20 years.

Three members of the Japanese Red Army undertook a terrorist attack on behalf of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine at Tel Aviv’s Lod airport (now Ben Gurion International) on May 30, 1972.

North Korea, United States
Terror Victims Lose Bid to Recover Funds From No. Korea

By Mark Hamblett |

North Korea's removal from a list of state sponsors of terrorism while a case claiming it provided the weapons used in a 1972 attack was pending has led the Second Circuit to refuse to allow the attachment of $378 million in funds recovered in a default judgment.

Singapore, United Kingdom
From the Experts: Rule Revisions From 5 Top Global Arbitral Institutions

By Kiera Gans and Amy Billing |

in the last two years, four major international arbitral institutions—the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the International Centre for Dispute Resolution and the Singapore International Arbitration Centre—have overhauled their procedures to try to improve functionality and make their institutions more attractive to users.

China
From the Experts: What to Do When the Chinese Government Comes Knocking

By Steve Olson and Bingna Guo |

Since becoming President and General Secretary of China's Communist Party in 2012, Xi Jinping has made fighting corruption—both in the government and in commerce—a national priority. As recent events demonstrate, a foreign passport will not deter Chinese authorities in their fight against corruption.

Shanghai, China

China
Knowles Evens Score in IP Fight With Chinese Rival

By Lisa Shuchman |

Amid claims that its client was unfairly bullied by protectionist Chinese courts, a team from Covington won a key victory at the U.S. International Trade Commission in an intercontinental patent feud involving mobile device technology.

India
US Reviewing India IP Practices, With Focus on Pharma

By Lisa Shuchman |

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has begun its “out-of-cycle review” of India’s intellectual property practices. Such a review could in theory lead to U.S. sanctions against India if the USTR concludes that India’s policies impede protection of intellectual property.

Philippines
Philippines Broadcaster Prevails in Battle With Pirate

By Sheri Qualters |

ABS-CBN Corp. has secured a $10 million U.S. judgment against a copyright and trademark infringer as an early victory in a broader court campaign against Internet pirates.

Kyrgyzstan argued that Eugene Gourevitch stole $6 million from the republic.

Kyrgyzstan
Restitution Bid Fails in Wire Fraud Involving Kyrgyzstan

By Andrew Keshner |

In a wire fraud case against a onetime investment banker connected to a now-deposed regime in the central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, a judge has ruled the prosecution's inability to identify exactly who the money was stolen from has made the task of restitution impossible.

China
Wachtell Fends Off Class Action Sparked by Avon Bribes Flap in China

By Jan Wolfe |

Allegations that Avon bribed its way into the Chinese market sparked a massive internal probe and a criminal settlement. But a judge sent a proposed securities class action over the scandal back to the drawing board on Monday, dealing a defeat to plaintiffs lawyers at Motley Rice.

Royce Lamberth.

Indonesia
Exxon Loses Bid to Dismiss Human Rights Lawsuit

By Zoe Tillman |

Indonesian citizens suing Exxon Mobil Corp. over the deaths, injuries or disappearances of their family members—allegedly at the hands of soldiers hired by the oil company—can move forward with their case, a federal judge in Washington ruled on Wednesday. The lawsuit centers on Exxon’s development of a natural gas field in an Indonesian province beginning in the 1970s.

Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco.

South Korea
Settlement Talks Underway 'In Earnest' in Asiana Crash

By Amanda Bronstad |

Asiana Airlines Inc. is in talks to settle lawsuits filed by as many as 70 passengers of Flight 224, which crashed while landing at San Francisco International Airport last year. The July 6, 2013, crash killed three people and injured about 180.

Australia, Ireland
Big Tobacco Takes Aim at Plain Packaging Laws

By Lisa Shuchman |

As Ireland and other countries threaten to follow Australia in banning logos and other distinguishing marks from cigarette packages, tobacco companies fight back with trademark law.

Journalists follow the progress on a television screen of the trial of British investigator Peter Humphrey (center) linked to beleaguered pharmaceutical giant GSK and his wife, at the Shanghai Intermediate Court on August 8, 2014.

China
ChinaWhys Trial Underlines Due Diligence Obstacles in China

By Wenxiong Zhang |

International law firms often rely on corporate intelligence firms to investigate clients' Chinese business partners or third-party suppliers. Following the conviction of two corporate investigators, lawyers are concerned about new challenges to conducting due diligence in China.

Kazakhstan, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Argentina, Ecuador
Global Legal Awards: Global Disputes of the Year

The American Lawyer Global Disputes of the Year Awards honor the winning team in transnational cases regardless of the venue.

Xiang Wenbo, president of China's Sany Heavy Industry Co. Ltd., has been restlessly promoting the Ralls decision as a historical victory for Chinese companies.

China
Sany's Win Chips Away at CFIUS Secrecy. Now What?

By Anna Zhang |

When the U.S. government ordered a Sany affiliate to sell land near a U.S. Navy base because of national security concerns, Sany won an unprecedented ruling that CFIUS, the government body that reviewed the transaction, had denied the Chinese company due process. But plenty of obstacles remain for Sany's challenge.

al-jazeera

Qatar
Gore Details Al-Jazeera Dispute in New Filings

By Jeff Mordock |

Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore has alleged Al-Jazeera America Holdings Inc. is withholding $65 million owed to Current Media shareholders so it could wage legal battles against cable distributors, according to updated court papers filed in the Delaware Court of Chancery.

China
Chinese Court Acquits Four-Time Death-Row Inmate

By Anna Zhang |

Nian Bin was released immediately after Fujian Provincial High Court overturned a lower court’s guilty verdict of fatally poisoning two children.

Desert traverse

Kuwait
Auto Accident in Kuwait Leads to Jurisdictional Dispute

By Max Mitchell |

When Virginia resident Morgan Lee Hanks' Mitsubishi Pajero collided with the Dodge Durango driven by Pennsylvania native Brian Mark Patton, who died in the accident, the ensuing motor vehicle litigation was anything but ordinary.

Global Lawyer, Argentina
The Global Lawyer: Cleary's Litigation Slump

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

In the past six months Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton litigators have lost a string of historic cases. Powerful entities routinely ask Cleary to push the envelope in international law. Lately it hasn't worked out well.

US Federal District Judge Kevin McNulty, Martin Luther King Courthouse, Newark, NJ.

China
Judge Nixes Price-Fixing Suit Against Alleged Chinese Cartels

By Charles Toutant |

A $58 million antitrust suit, claiming Chinese companies conspired to fix prices for the mineral magnesite, was dismissed July 24 by a Newark federal judge who found that the plaintiffs lacked statutory standing to sue.

Japan
Tort Trouble Ahead?

By Anna Zhang |

A barrage of accounting fraud claims against Olympus Corp. may help set off a litigation boom in Japan.

Raymond Kwok (left) and Thomas Kwok, co-chairmen of Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd.

China, Hong Kong
Will Antitycoon Mood Affect Hong Kong Trial?

By Anthony Lin |

Thomas and Raymond Kwok, two of Hong Kong's—and the world's—richest men, are going on trial May 8 for allegedly bribing a senior government official. It is the territory's largest corruption trial ever, and it's taking place amid a rising tide of resentment toward the billionaire developers who dominate the Hong Kong economic landscape. Will antitycoon sentiment show up in the courtroom?

South Korea
Google Lawyer Details Defense Pact With Samsung

By Julia Love, The Recorder |

Apple's trial team, led by Morrison & Foerster's Harold McElhinny, plays deposition testimony on Android indemnity agreement.

Japan
Mitsubishi Loses Appeal in Chip Design Case

By Scott Graham, The Recorder |

California's Sixth District Court of Appeal upheld a verdict against Mitsubishi Electric Inc. for breaching a non-disclosure agreement but agreed with a superior court judge that the $123 million awarded by jurors was excessive.

China
U.S. Judge Rules Baidu Has Protected Right to Censor

By Tom Brennan |

A New York federal judge dismissed a lawsuit over Baidu's blocking of pro-democracy content, ruling that the Chinese search engine had a First Amendment right to control the content presented to its users.

Japan
Toyota Pays $1.2B for Misleading U.S.; Civil Claims Remain

By Amanda Bronstad |

A $1.2 billion settlement between Toyota Motor Corp. and the U.S. Department of Justice will have little direct effect on negotiations to settle remaining lawsuits over deaths and injuries associated with sudden acceleration, but could sway jurors should those cases go to trial, according to attorneys involved in those actions.