Asian Disputes

China
Video Game Exec Charged With Trade Secrets Theft

By David Ruiz |

Terminated employee of Machine Zone was arrested just before boarding a flight to China after an FBI investigation.

China, Japan
Most Countries Keep Bribery Prosecution Within Borders

By Rebekah Mintzer |

More than half the countries that signed on to an international bribery law convention haven't ventured beyond their own countries.

India
The Global Lawyer: The Slave Next Door

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

A dozen law firms team up to stop human trafficking, and send Congress a signal.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Barack Obama at a G-20 summit in Brisbane, Australia last November. They will meet again next month in Washington, D.C. for Xi's first state visit where China's hunt for economic fugitives in the U.S. is expected to be discussed.

China
China’s Uneasy Embrace of U.S. Justice for Corrupt Fugitives

By Anna Zhang |

The trial of alleged embezzler Zhao Shilan will be the first U.S. prosecution of a Chinese economic fugitive since China began to hunt for corrupt officials living overseas last year. But difficulties in cooperation between the two countries means a conviction is far from guaranteed.

Manny Pacquiao, left, from the Philippines, trades blows with Floyd Mayweather Jr., during their welterweight title fight on Saturday, May 2, 2015 in Las Vegas.

Philippines
In Boxing Litigation, Pacquiao and HBO Win First Round

By Amanda Bronstad |

Emmanuel "Manny" Pacquiao and Home Box Office Inc. won the first round in the litigation over his highly publicized match against Floyd Mayweather after a federal panel sent more than 40 consumer class actions to a judge in Los Angeles.

Japan
Sony Hit With Trade Secrets Suit Over PlayStation Heroes

By Marisa Kendall |

A startup backed by a former L.A. Galaxy player accuses Sony of ripping of its idea for a charitable gaming platform.

China
China Two-Step: Re-Register Trademarks With Customs

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

It's not enough to register a trademark in the normal way. If you want to protect your marks, register them with the country's customs agency.

Judge Kaplan

China, Iran
Chinese GC Ordered to US for Deposition in Patent Case

By Mark Hamblett |

A federal judge has ordered the general counsel of a Chinese corporation to come to the United States for a deposition in a patent case, despite the attorney's fear of a possible arrest upon entry by U.S. authorities in a criminal investigation into a violation of the embargo against the Iranian regime.

Mega International Commercial Bank at 65 Liberty St.

Taiwan
Taiwanese Bank Told to Comply With Information Subpoena

By Ben Bedell |

Although bank accounts held outside New York cannot be frozen or seized to satisfy a New York judgment, an information subpoena can be used to determine where the accounts are located within the bank, a unanimous First Department panel has held.

Maxwell Chambers, location of the Singapore International Arbitration Center. Photo by Nicolas Lannuzel

Cambodia, China, Hong Kong, India, Kazakhstan, Singapore, South Korea
Asia Still Sees Fewer Big Arbitrations

By Anna Zhang |

The latest Arbitration Scorecard finds only seven—out of 128—billion-dollar disputes that are being heard in Asia. But Asian arbitral institutes in Singapore, Hong Kong, China and beyond see no shortage of smaller cases.

China, Hong Kong, Philippines
E-Discovery Expands in Asia as Regional M&A Activity Heats Up

By Ed Silverstein |

To be successful, practitioners need to understand the distinct legal paradigms that subsist in the APAC region.

China
U.S. Securities Class Actions Target More Chinese Companies

By Anna Zhang |

The latest report from Cornerstone Research and Stanford Law School finds that suits against Asian companies—most of them Chinese—account for more than half of shareholder class actions filed in the United States during the first six months of 2015.

Intercontinental Conundrum: Navigating Litigation Holds

By Caroline Mitchell and David DiMeglio |

Companies facing incidents that might attract international attention must assess whether U.S. litigation is reasonably anticipated, thus triggering the need for a litigation hold.

Bio-Rad headquarters in Hercules, CA

China
Bio-Rad Fires Back at Former General Counsel

By David Ruiz |

Sanford Wadler was fired for misconduct, the company's lawyers said, not in retaliation for speaking up about possible corruption in Bio-Rad's business dealings in China.

Japan
A Qualitative Approach to Winning E-Discovery Business in Japan

By David M. Sannar |

There is no magic to winning business in Japan. It’s all about careful listening, honest explanations, and patiently waiting for the right decision.

China
China Denies Role in Hack Attack on Arb Court Website

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

A cyber-security breach at the Permanent Court of Arbitration places at risk any law firm that tracks arbitration in The Hague.

Clouds at sunset on the South China Sea

China
The Global Lawyer: Not the South China Sea, Not in Court

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Last week arbitrators in The Hague heard from Foley Hoag's Paul Reichler in the first phase of the world's most misunderstood maritime battle, over the status of a few rocks that form the most controversial dots on the world map.

Pakistan, Australia, Sweden, United Kingdom
Coordinated Effort from 20 Countries Targets Darkode Hacking Forum

By Zach Warren |

Twelve Darkode members have been charged with computer fraud conspiracy following an FBI infiltration of the forum.

China
Chinese E-Commerce Loophole Set to Close

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

Companies selling products to Chinese consumers have been avoiding strict consumer laws by selling directly via e-commerce. But that might not be a viable option much longer.

Marc Kasowitz is representing Macquarie Capital in its malpractice case against Morrison & Foerster.

China, Australia
MoFo, Macquarie Square Off in Puda Coal Malpractice Case

By Scott Flaherty |

Macquarie Capital appears to have made peace with U.S. regulators over the messy demise of China's Puda Coal. But Macquarie's fight with its former lawyers at Morrison & Foerster is just heating up.

2015 Arbitration Scorecard: Biggest Awards, Biggest Defense Wins and Biggest Settlements

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

The international arbitrations that resulted in the largest public awards and the largest public settlements, 2013-2014. Plus, the biggest billion-dollar claims that were dismissed in the same period.

2015 Arbitration Scorecard: Contract and Treaty Disputes

By Michael D. Goldhaber, Craig Savitzky and Antoinette Cocorinos |

Billion-dollar arbitrations that were active in 2013-2014.

2015 Arbitration Scorecard: Deciding the World's Biggest Disputes

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Our survey finds more billion-dollar cases than ever—and they’re being heard by the same tiny club of arbitrators.

Floyd Mayweather Jr., left, hits Manny Pacquiao, from the Philippines, during their welterweight title fight on Saturday, May 2, 2015 in Las Vegas.

Philippines
Mayweather-Pacquiao Fight Sparks More Than 40 Class Actions

By Amanda Bronstad |

More than 40 class actions have been filed over last month’s highly publicized fight between Floyd Mayweather and Emmanuel “Manny” Pacquiao, alleging that the boxers, their promoters and the cable networks airing the match misled viewers about the “Fight of the Century.”

Vietnam
Protecting an International Brand's IP in Vietnam

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

Vietnam's 93 million residents, a large percentage of whom are under 40, have money to spend on foreign goods and services.

Takata Corp displays at a showroom for vehicles in Tokyo, Japan on May 20, 2015.

Japan
Takata Executive 'Deeply Sorry' for Air Bag Defects

By Mike Sacks |

A senior executive from Takata Corp. appeared before the Senate Commerce Committee on Tuesday to update lawmakers on the recall of nearly 34 million vehicles installed with the company's air bags.

Kazakhstan, United Kingdom
Kazakhstan Wins Access to Documents of Law Firm Clyde & Co

By Scott Flaherty |

In a battle over foreign oil and gas assets, the Republic of Kazakhstan has won a ruling that the New York office of U.K.-based law firm Clyde & Co must turn over information about the value of an oil and gas plant seized by the republic.

Japan
Catalyst Moves Insight and Insight Predict Into Japan

By Sean Doherty |

Catalyst Repository Systems' Insight e-discovery platform with technology-assisted review is available in Japan.

Benjamin Wey

China
Harassment Suit Moves Forward Against China Stock Promoter

By Scott Flaherty |

A former employee of a U.S. firm that shepherds Chinese companies through reverse mergers claims its owner, Benjamin Wey, sexually harassed her and then used his own online soapbox to defame her.

China
Inhospitable Hospitality: BHP Billiton's $25M FCPA Fine

By Rebekah Mintzer |

Lessons for companies abound in the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act investigation that arose from BHP Billiton's sponsorship of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing.

Panel discussion on Chinese antitrust enforcement at U.S.-China Legal Summit held on May 21, 2015 at the Ritz-Carlton Beijing Financial Street. From left to right: Susan Ning, King & Wood Mallesons Beijing partner; Liu Jian, deputy director of China National Development and Reform Commission Price Supervision and Anti-Monopoly Bureau; Lei Lingfei, policy director, Intel China.

China
China's Newest Antitrust Enforcement Target: IP

By Anna Zhang |

There will be more and more cases involving intellectual property, says a top Chinese lawyer in the practice. Here’s what foreign companies need to know.

Bio-Rad headquarters in Hercules, CA

China
Former Bio-Rad GC Files Whistle-Blower Suit Over Firing

By David Ruiz |

Sanford Wadler claims he was blocked from investigating corruption in China as the company worked to nail down its $55 million FCPA settlement with the federal government.

U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag

China
Feds Charge Chinese Engineers With Stealing Silicon Valley Technology

By Marisa Kendall |

The group, including a former employee of Avago Technologies, allegedly applied for patents and used a Cayman Island shell company for cover.

Amy Berman Jackson.

South Korea
At U.S. Border, Laptops Are Not Searchable Like Handbags, Judge Tells Feds

By Zoe Tillman |

Federal agents do not have unlimited power to search laptops and other electronic devices without a warrant at the border, including airports, a federal judge in Washington ruled. The decision came in a case involving a Korean businessman whose laptop was seized by the Department of Homeland Security in 2012.

Singapore
A Conversation With The Minister for Law in Singapore

By Anna Zhang |

Speaking with The Asian Lawyer, Minister K. Shanmugam outlines his vision of building the city state into the New York of Southeast Asia's legal services.

China
China's Respect for IP: It's Getting Better

By Lisa Shuchman |

Remember the stacks of pirated DVDs, the copycat cars, the bogus phones? They still exist, but increasingly at the margins as China gets its intellectual property act together.

China, India, Canada
US Trade Office Calls Out 37 Countries for IP Practices

By Lisa Shuchman |

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative released its annual "Special 301 Report" on intellectual property rights.

UBS at 299 Park Ave.

South Korea
Panel Says Commercial Case Belongs in Korean Court

By Ben Bedell |

The Appellate Division, First Department, affirmed dismissal of a Commercial Division case Tuesday, holding that the transaction at issue did not have a "substantial nexus" to the state.

Military soldiers wearing DuPont Kevlar vests and helmets, which provide protection against a wide range of threats, including bullets, shrapnel and fragmentation.

South Korea
Long Fight Over Kevlar Trade Secret Theft Resolved for $360M

By Jenna Greene |

A South Korean company accused of stealing trade secrets from E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. agreed to pay $360 million in restitution and fines on Thursday, settling a long-running dispute over Kevlar brand technology.

Rescue operation using heavy machinery on April 30, 2013 at Rana Plaza in Savar.  On April 24 an eight-story commercial building, Rana Plaza, collapsed in Savar, a sub-district near Dhaka, Bangladesh.

Bangladesh
Wal-Mart, JC Penney Sued Over Bangladesh Factory Collapse

By Zoe Tillman |

An eight-story building that housed garment factories in Bangladesh, collapsed on April 24, 2013, killing more than 1,000 people and injuring many more. This week, the victims and their families filed a lawsuit in federal court in Washington against Wal-Mart and other retailers that allegedly sourced products from those factories.

Hong Kong, France, Germany
Diagnosing Sick Leave Laws Around the World

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

When you're "sick" in France, you might not be "sick" in Germany.

China
FireEye Suspects China of 10-Year Cyberespionage Operation

By Erin E. Harrison |

Report concludes governments, businesses and journalists have all been affected by a Chinese cybertheft operation.

Technological and Cultural Challenges of Cross-Border E-Discovery

By Christopher DiMarco |

A Q&A with Deloitte's Andy Ruckman: Reliance on local counsel is a critical consideration, but evolving technology can streamline international discovery.

Alibaba banners hang on the front facade of the New York Stock Exchange.

China
For Chinese Companies Facing U.S. Class Actions, Déjà Vu All Over Again?

By Anna Zhang |

Not necessarily, lawyers say. Alibaba and other Chinese newcomers to U.S. exchanges are far different from the companies, like now-defunct Sino Forest, that came before. Here’s why.

China
Morrison & Foerster Sued Over Stock Offering for China's Puda Coal

By Scott Flaherty |

The defunct, fraud-addled Chinese company Puda Coal was disaster for its investors, and remains a major litigation headache for its bankers. Now the investment bank Macquarie Group wants the lawyers to share the blame.

Uber

India
Uber Taps Gibson Team to Fight Liability for Alleged Rape by Driver

By Ross Todd |

Gibson Dunn partner Michael Wong, a former federal prosecutor, was hired to fend off a suit filed by a Delhi woman who claims stronger background checks could have prevented her attack.

China
Don't Laugh Off China's Tech Regulations for Banks

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

The People's Republic of China has introduced highly restrictive technology rules for banks and financial institutions.

China
Lawyers for Lenovo, Superfish Face Venue Battle

By Ross Todd |

The Chinese laptop maker and Valley adware firm are pushing for a throng of suits to be consolidated in the Northern District of California.

Macau
Judge Fines Sands $250K, Demands China Casino Documents

By Sue Reisinger |

A local judge in Las Vegas has ordered the China Sands Ltd. casino to deliver records related to a wrongful termination case, despite the Sands GC's testimony that following the order could send executives in Macau to jail.

China
Chinese Arbitration Award Stands in Mineral Co. Fight

By P.J. D'Annunzio |

A federal judge has ruled that an international arbitration award in favor of a China-based mineral supplier can be enforced upon an American company in a contract dispute.

Kazakhstan, Spain
Computer Hack in Kazakhstan Exposes Client Emails with Curtis Mallet

Emails between Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle and its client, the Republic of Kazakhstan, were posted online in January after that government’s computers were hacked. Kazakhstan’s counsel at Curtis says in a complaint filed Thursday against the alleged hackers that some of the emails contained privileged and confidential attorney-client communications.

India
India Eyes Reforms to a Disputes System Held in Low Repute

By Tom Brennan |

The country's reputation for bogging foreign investors down in litigation for years and overturning foreign arbitral awards may start to change if two soon-to-be-introduced laws are passed this year. It's all part of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's plan to attract new business to the Indian economy.

LEGO Friends.

China, Denmark
Lego Sues to Block Imports in Patent Fight Over Toy Dolls

By Jenna Greene |

The International Trade Commission on Wednesday gave a green light to toymaker Lego A/S to bring a patent and copyright infringement case against three competitors that are seeking to appeal more to girls. Lego says its rivals copied its "Friends" line.

China
US Companies Criticize China's New Data Rules

In the name of antiterrorism, China may require all companies to keep their servers and user data within the country, and demand that technology firms turn over encryption keys.

China, Hong Kong, South Korea
From the Experts: A Global Perspective on Antitrust Regulation

By Thomas A. McGrath and Fay Zhou |

Antitrust/competition regulators are becoming more active and are in increasingly closer contact with each other. It's almost cartel-like.

Chinese Furniture Factory in the Guangdong Province, China

China
The Global Lawyer: The U.S. Offensive in the China Trade War

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

When it comes to protectionism, China isn't blameless. But the United States wields its trade laws just as aggressively against Chinese companies.

China
China Tightening Rules on Personal Data

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

A new personal information law in China aims to protect consumer personal information and clarify the obligations of companies operating in the region.

China
Quarantine for Digital Devices That Travel Overseas

By Marlisse Silver Sweeney |

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security expects that when employees travel overseas, their devices may come back bugged. So into quarantine they go.

China
Sands China Casino GC Bows to Chinese Data Privacy Law

The general counsel of the Sands China casino in Macau is caught between Chinese data privacy law and a Nevada judge's order that the casino disclose private information.

China
Qualcomm To Pay $975M China Antitrust Fine

By Anna Zhang |

The San Diego-based chipmaker will also charge lower patent royalties in China as the result of a 14-month antimonopoly investigation.

China
China Formally Detains Canadian Man Suspected of Espionage

By Anna Zhang |

Kevin Garratt has been moved to a detention center after months under house arrest for allegedly stealing Chinese state secrets. His wife, who also was being held, has been released on bail.

Andrew Ceresney.

China
'Big Four' China Affiliates Settle SEC Charges

By Jenna Greene |

Four China-based accounting firms affiliated with the "Big Four" on Friday agreed to pay $500,000 each to settle charges by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that they refused to turn over documents in multiple fraud investigations.

Chief Judge Gregory Sleet, District of Delaware

China, Romania
China's ZTE Wins TRO Blocking Romanian Sales Ban

By Scott Graham |

ZTE's legal team at Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman turned to the U.S. District Court for Delaware to stop an injunction entered last week by a court in Romania.

China, Israel
Boies Wins Discovery Fight in Bank of China Terror Funding Case

By Julie Triedman |

Over the objections of defense lawyers at Dorsey & Whitney and Squire Patton Boggs, Bank of China was ordered to turn over internal investigation records that could help plaintiffs tie the bank to a 2006 Palestinian terrorist attack.

An Uber car drives down Market Street in San Francisco

India
Delhi Woman Sues Uber Over Alleged Rape by Driver

By David Ruiz |

Lawyers for the woman say Uber performed inadequate checks of drivers and "breached its duty" to protect customers.

Betsy Benjaminson.

Japan
Toyota Nears Settlement with Blogging Translator

By Amanda Bronstad |

Toyota Motor Corp. is in settlement talks with a former translator and self-described whistleblower who was sanctioned last month for posting on a blog internal documents related to its sudden acceleration defects.

China, India, Russia
FCPA Shifts in China, India, Russia and Latin America

By Sue Reisinger |

Lawyers from Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher offered their views on changes to Foreign Corrupt Practices Act enforcement in emerging markets.

Takata airbag components on view before a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing titled “Examining Takata Airbag Defects and the Vehicle Recall Process.” November 20, 2014.

Japan
Squire Patton Boggs to Lobby for Takata Corp.

By Andrew Ramonas |

The embattled air bag manufacturer has enlisted one of the firm's partners, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation Rodney Slater, as a special counsel.

Japan
Honda Hit With Record $70M Fine

By Jenna Greene |

American Honda Motor Co. Inc. will pay two fines totaling a record $70 million to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration for failing to report deaths, injuries and certain warranty claims to the federal government.

Stephen Kass

The Environmental Struggle Within the Trans-Pacific Partnership

By Stephen L. Kass |

In his International Environmental Law column, Stephen L. Kass writes that the tension between economists, investors and manufacturers favoring the elimination of most constraints on international trade and environmentalists (and labor advocates) fearful of a "race to the bottom" by countries competing for new factories has once again taken center stage in a struggle that is threatening to derail the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement.

China
Taming the Beast

By Anna Zhang |

As China cracks down on corruption, international firms with FCPA expertise are gearing up.

Indonesia, Australia, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Uruguay
A Guide to the Legal Battles Over Tobacco Packaging

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Big Tobacco is fighting plain-packaging regulations in court, in the World Trade Organization, and in international arbitrations.

Hong Kong
Out With the Oligarchs?

By Anna Zhang |

A new competition law is creating plenty of work for lawyers. But local moguls needn't panic just yet.

Australia, United Kingdom, Uruguay
Smoke and Lawyers

By Michael D. Goldhaber |

Big Tobacco is attacking packaging regulations with both trade law and arbitration. Which is the better weapon?

China
MWE China Launches First E-Discovery Center

By Anna Zhang |

Chicago's McDermott Will & Emery extends its Chinese alliance into discovery and data analysis as demand for investigations and compliance work grows.

Francis Kwan, former vice president of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, left, Rafael Hui, Hong Kong's former chief secretary, second left, Thomas Chan, former executive board member of Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd., second right, and Thomas Kwok, former co-chairman of Sun Hung Kai Properties Ltd., right, arrive at the High Court in a prison van in Hong Kong.

China, Hong Kong
Hong Kong Billionaire, Ex-Official Jailed For Corruption

By Anna Zhang |

Thomas Kwok and Rafael Hui will each spend five and seven-and-a-half years in prison as Hong Kong vows to build corruption-free government and business community.

First group of post-war child migrants arrive in Fremantle, Western Australia in 1947.

Australia
US Court Affirms Dismissal of Suit by Victims of Child Migration to Australia

By Ben Bedell |

The plaintiffs had sued the U.S. affiliates of various Australia Catholic orders in the Southern District of New York in 2009, alleging violations of customary international law, including slavery and involuntary servitude, child trafficking, forced child labor and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment.

Thurgood Marshall U.S. Courthouse at 40 Foley Square

China
Immigrant Must Show Poverty to Gain Asylum, Circuit Rules

By Mark Hamblett |

An immigrant seeking asylum after being fined for resisting China's coercive population control program has to show the fine "actually deprived him of the basic necessities of life or reduced him to an impoverished existence" in asserting a claim of past persecution, the Second Circuit said Friday.

Judge Raymond Chen, U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

South Korea
Federal Circuit Toys With Remanding Part of Apple-Samsung Fight

By Scott Graham |

The Federal Circuit hears Samsung's appeal of Apple's nearly $1 billion trial verdict in the companies first showdown over the look and feel of their rival smartphones and tablets. Judges Chen, Prost and O'Malley are on the panel. Big issues is must Samsung disgorge all profits over design patents.

Robert Wick

Litigator of the Week: Robert Wick of Covington & Burling

By David Bario |

Wick twice persuaded the Seventh Circuit to throw out $3.5 billion in price-fixing claims against Asia-based LCD panel manufacturers, winning a decision last week with important implications for other foreign and U.S. companies.

Hiroshi Shimizu.

Japan
Takata Exec Defends Decision to Limit Air Bag Recall

By Andrew Ramonas |

In his second public appearance on Capitol Hill in three weeks, senior vice president for global quality assurance Hiroshi Shimizu told lawmakers that the most recent information his company has on the problem shows that the Japanese manufacturer doesn't need to expand recalls beyond the 7.8 million U.S. cars and trucks in the hot and humid climates of many Southern states.

Betsy Benjaminson.

Japan
Tentative Sanctions Against Translator in Toyota Probes

By Amanda Bronstad |

A federal judge has tentatively sanctioned a former translator and subcontractor for Toyota who posted dozens of confidential documents relating to its sudden-acceleration recalls on her blog.

Hiroshi Shimizu, senior vice president of Global Quality Assurance at Takata Corporation, during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing titled “Examining Takata Airbag Defects and the Vehicle Recall Process.” November 20, 2014.

Japan
Auto Companies Lawyer Up Amid Takata Investigations

By Amanda Bronstad |

Auto companies that recalled 7.8 million U.S. cars and trucks over exploding air bags linked to injuries and deaths have retained counsel amid mounting legal pressure.

Hiroshi Shimizu

Japan
Senators Want Takata Internal Documents on Air Bag Defect

By Andrew Ramonas |

Democratic Sens. Bill Nelson of Florida and Jay Rockefeller IV of West Virginia have demanded numerous internal documents from the Japanese auto parts maker about its deadly air bag safety defect, saying a top executive at Takata left them with "many significant questions" about the problem.

 Motley Rice attorney Kevin Dean

Japan
Wrongful Death Suit Over Air Bags Filed in Federal Court

By Amanda Bronstad |

The first known lawsuit in federal court over a death linked to Takata Corp.'s recalls has been filed by the brother of a South Carolina woman who died after her air bag deployed during an automobile accident in 2008.

Hiroshi Shimizu, Senior Vice President of Global Quality Assurance at Takata Corporation, answers questions during a U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing titled “Examining Takata Airbag Defects and the Vehicle Recall Process.”  November 20, 2014.

Japan
U.S. Senators Call on Takata to Probe Air Bag Defect

By Andrew Ramonas |

The Japanese auto parts company is under pressure by politicians to initiate an independent investigation into a deadly air bag safety defect, following a news report that it covered up the problem.

Andrew Levander (L), David Bernick (R)

Japan
Dechert's Lateral Hires Take Lead for Troubled Takata

By Brian Baxter |

The embattled Japanese auto parts company has retained a high-powered defense team from Dechert to handle a criminal probe, congressional inquiry and class action litigation related to a growing scandal into defective airbags.

Toyota Motor Corp.'s showroom in Tokyo.

Japan
Regulators Extend Takata Recall to Entire U.S.

By Amanda Bronstad |

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has announced a nationwide recall of cars and trucks with air bags made by the Japanese company. The recall, limited to vehicles with Takata air bags on the driver's side, came after an air bag ruptured in an incident outside a region of high humidity. The previous Takata recalls of 7.8 million vehicles were limited to those states in hot and humid climates.

Japan
Takata Called to Capitol Hill Over Air Bag Safety

By Andrew Ramonas |

Senators plan to put Takata Corp. under the microscope, holding a hearing on the Japanese company's air bag safety defect that allegedly caused five deaths and prompted a U.S. criminal investigation and class action lawsuits.

China, India, Russia
Are Your Brands Safe in China, India and Russia?

By Lisa Shuchman |

A company’s brands are among its most important assets. But a new survey shows that corporate executives and legal departments charged with protecting those assets consider their brands to be most vulnerable in China, India and Russia.

Malaysia, Singapore
Malaysia Won $1.2B Arbitration Against Singapore

By Anna Zhang |

The Southeast Asian neighbors both agreed to accept the decision and proceed with the development delayed for 20 years.

Three members of the Japanese Red Army undertook a terrorist attack on behalf of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine at Tel Aviv’s Lod airport (now Ben Gurion International) on May 30, 1972.

North Korea, United States
Terror Victims Lose Bid to Recover Funds From No. Korea

By Mark Hamblett |

North Korea's removal from a list of state sponsors of terrorism while a case claiming it provided the weapons used in a 1972 attack was pending has led the Second Circuit to refuse to allow the attachment of $378 million in funds recovered in a default judgment.

Singapore, United Kingdom
From the Experts: Rule Revisions From 5 Top Global Arbitral Institutions

By Kiera Gans and Amy Billing |

in the last two years, four major international arbitral institutions—the International Chamber of Commerce, the London Court of International Arbitration, the International Centre for Dispute Resolution and the Singapore International Arbitration Centre—have overhauled their procedures to try to improve functionality and make their institutions more attractive to users.

China
From the Experts: What to Do When the Chinese Government Comes Knocking

By Steve Olson and Bingna Guo |

Since becoming President and General Secretary of China's Communist Party in 2012, Xi Jinping has made fighting corruption—both in the government and in commerce—a national priority. As recent events demonstrate, a foreign passport will not deter Chinese authorities in their fight against corruption.

Shanghai, China

China
Knowles Evens Score in IP Fight With Chinese Rival

By Lisa Shuchman |

Amid claims that its client was unfairly bullied by protectionist Chinese courts, a team from Covington won a key victory at the U.S. International Trade Commission in an intercontinental patent feud involving mobile device technology.

India
US Reviewing India IP Practices, With Focus on Pharma

By Lisa Shuchman |

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has begun its “out-of-cycle review” of India’s intellectual property practices. Such a review could in theory lead to U.S. sanctions against India if the USTR concludes that India’s policies impede protection of intellectual property.

Philippines
Philippines Broadcaster Prevails in Battle With Pirate

By Sheri Qualters |

ABS-CBN Corp. has secured a $10 million U.S. judgment against a copyright and trademark infringer as an early victory in a broader court campaign against Internet pirates.

Kyrgyzstan argued that Eugene Gourevitch stole $6 million from the republic.

Kyrgyzstan
Restitution Bid Fails in Wire Fraud Involving Kyrgyzstan

By Andrew Keshner |

In a wire fraud case against a onetime investment banker connected to a now-deposed regime in the central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, a judge has ruled the prosecution's inability to identify exactly who the money was stolen from has made the task of restitution impossible.

China
Wachtell Fends Off Class Action Sparked by Avon Bribes Flap in China

By Jan Wolfe |

Allegations that Avon bribed its way into the Chinese market sparked a massive internal probe and a criminal settlement. But a judge sent a proposed securities class action over the scandal back to the drawing board on Monday, dealing a defeat to plaintiffs lawyers at Motley Rice.

Royce Lamberth.

Indonesia
Exxon Loses Bid to Dismiss Human Rights Lawsuit

By Zoe Tillman |

Indonesian citizens suing Exxon Mobil Corp. over the deaths, injuries or disappearances of their family members—allegedly at the hands of soldiers hired by the oil company—can move forward with their case, a federal judge in Washington ruled on Wednesday. The lawsuit centers on Exxon’s development of a natural gas field in an Indonesian province beginning in the 1970s.